NEWSLETTERS 
Co-Founders Rob Burleigh and Francis Dodds share their knowledge and insights into agricultural science, publishing and the latest news at Burleigh Dodds 
To keep up to date with the release of new titles and business announcements, register for our weekly video newsletters. 
Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
7 October 2021 

Editor Announcement 

We're delighted to announce that Professor Toyoki Kozai and Eri Hayashi have agreed to edit our forthcoming collection: Advances in plant factories: New technologies in indoor vertical farming. 
 
Professor Kozai is former President of Chiba University, Japan, where he is now Emeritus Professor. He is also Honorary President of the Japan Plant Factory Association (JPFA) and a former President of The Agricultural Academy of Japan. 
 
Eri Hayashi is Vice President of the JPFA where she is also Director of International Relations and Consulting. Eri has been Research Project Leader for a project on Artificial Intelligence- and Phenotyping-based Smart Plant Factories with Artificial Lighting (PFALs). 
 
Find out more about our new editors here

How Can We Better Protect Our Agroecosystems? 

agroecosystems, sustainable agriculture
Recent years have seen the development of a debate surrounding farmers' reliance on the use of pesticides and fertilisers to protect and enhance their crop yields. 
 
With one side arguing that agrochemical alternatives cannot produce the required crop yields needed to support the rapidly growing population, the other side emphasise the variety of dangers that the continued use of traditional agrochemicals can bring to the environment, as well as human health. 
 
The Rothamsted Research Institute, UK have brought together a team of their resident experts to tackle the main themes of the debate, discussing key elements such as: 
 
• The development of more sustainable, environmentally-friendly crop pest, weed and disease control solutions 
• The role of technology in reducing the need to use pesticides 
• The challenge of keeping soil phosphorus at an optimum 
 
Read the expert's verdict on the sector's reliance on pesticides here
 
Alternatively, read another expert's verdict on the sector's use of fertilisers here

Key Titles on the Emergence of Biocontrol Solutions 

Edited by 
Dr Jürgen Köhl, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands and Willem J. Ravensberg, Koppert Biological Solutions, The Netherlands 
 
About the Book 
 
This collection summarises and reviews the wealth of recent research on the development of more environmentally friendly biological methods to control plant diseases. 
 
Check out some chapters from this book which have already been published as Open Access here
Edited by 
Professor Nick Birch, formerly The James Hutton Institute, UK and Professor Travis Glare, Lincoln University, New Zealand 
 
Key Features 
 
• Reviews key steps in biopesticide product development 
• Comprehensive coverage of the range of biopesticides, from microbial to natural substance-based biopesticides 
• Strong focus on pheromone and allelochemical semiochemicals as well as peptide-based biopesticides 
 
Edited by 
Youssef Rouphael, Patrick du Jardin, Patrick Brown, Stefania De Pascale and Giuseppe Colla 
 
About the Book 
Biostimulants stimulate natural processes in crops to enhance nutrient uptake, nutrient use efficiency (NUE), resistance to abiotic stress and quality traits. This collection reviews key advances in understanding and using biostimulants. 

News 

pollination services, agriculture
Greater support needed for pollination services in agriculture 
 
Pollinators are declining rapidly on a global scale. This decline threatens global food security, with pollinator species (typically bees) contributing to around 35% of the world's food production. With the potential impact monumental, many working across the sector are calling for greater support for pollinators and the services they offer. Most recently, research from the University of Göttingen, Germany has suggested that yields could be increased if the existence of pollinators was encouraged.  
[Read more here]. 
 
mycotoxins, maize
Detecting mycotoxins in maize crops 
 
A team of researchers from Embrapa, Brazil and the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil have discovered that mycotoxins in maize crops can be identified efficiently and accurately using near infrared imagery. Throughout the course of the study, the researchers were able to successfully identify F. verticillioides and F. graminearum - the two fungi most associated with the development of mycotoxins. This discovery is already being heralded as a replacement for the more expensive methods of analysis. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Mycotoxin detection and control 
food shortages, climate change, sustainable agriculture
Food shortages exacerbated by climate change 
 
Two of the UK's biggest supermarkets - Tesco and Sainsbury's - are struggling to stock their shelves with pasta due to a global shortage of durum wheat. Wheat is ground into semolina to make popular pasta types, such as spaghetti and penne. This shortage has occurred due to rising temperatures and prolonged periods of drought, as a result of climate change. Canada, who are one of the largest producers and exporters of wheat - have been hit extremely hard this summer, with their yields down by up to 50%. [Read more here]. 
 
smallholders, smallholder farming
Zambian smallholder farmers to benefit from new initiative 
 
A new initiative launched by Zanaco which has been backed by the European Union and the European Investment Bank will see smallholder farmers working in Zambia benefit from an investment of around €30 million. The initiative has been developed to support and improve the country's current rate of agricultural productivity and profitability. The €30 million investment will be utilised to generate greater financing options which can be offered to both male and female smallholder farmers. [Read more here]. 
 

Supporting Smallholder Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa 

 
Edited by 
Dr Dominik Klauser and Dr Mike Robinson, Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture, Switzerland 
 
About the Book 
This volume reviews recent research on effective support to improve smallholder livelihoods. 
 
After discussing the economics of smallholder farming, the book looks at access to key inputs before assessing ways of improving extension and other services to support sustainable production practices. 
 
Read an excerpt from the book here

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
7 October 2021 

New Bill Presented to End Cages for Laying Hens in the UK 

chicken welfare, poultry welfare, laying hens
A new bill - Beatrice's Bill - has been introduced into parliament by the UK Conservative Party which suggests outlawing cages for laying hens reared in the UK. 
 
Referencing current statistics, around 16 million hens are raised in cages in the UK every year. 
 
Advocates for the banning of cages cite the impact of caging on the physical and behavioural needs of poultry, emphasising the development of health conditions as a result of being kept in restrictive environments. 
 
As a result of the successful introduction of the bill into Parliament, several of the UK's major animal health and welfare organisations, including the Conservative Animal Welfare Foundation (CAWF) and the Human League UK, have launched their own petition calling for the government to act on this bill and ban the caging of the nation's hens. This petition already has nearly 80,000 signatures. 
 
The bill was presented and passed unopposed in the House of Commons and will face a second reading on 22nd October. 
 
Read the full story here

New Title Emphasises the Importance of Meeting Poultry Welfare Standards 

Edited by 
Professor Christine Nicol, Royal Veterinary College - University of London, UK 
 
About the Book 
This book offers a comprehensive summary on the wealth of recent research completed on understanding chicken behaviour and discusses how best to use this rich body of knowledge to optimise welfare management of broilers and layers. 
 
It features expert insights into the use of wearable, video and acoustic technologies as a means of monitoring behaviour, as well as improving current welfare protocols. 

Discover the other titles in our animal welfare series... 

 
 
Edited by Emerita Professor Sandra Edwards, Newcastle University, UK 
 
Find out more about the book here
 
 
Edited by Professor Marcia Endres, University of Minnesota, USA 
 
Discover more about the book here

Fly Larvae To Be Used An Alternative Protein Source in Pig Feed 

fly larvae, animal feed, SBM
With the price of soybean meal (SBM) steadily increasing, farmers and producers alike are seeking alternative protein sources. Recent years have seen the emergence of insects for use in animal feed. 
 
New research by scientists at Wageningen University and Research and Leiden University, The Netherlands have claimed that black solider fly larvae can be used as a more sustainable source of protein for pigs as they can be grown on waste heaps that develop as a result of food production. 
 
The study saw researchers compare the impact of pigs fed black solider fly larvae, compared to a control group who were fed SBM. The researchers identified increased levels of Bifidobacterium - a bacteria which previous research studies have reported to have positive effects on both human and animal health. 
 
Read the full article here

New Title Explores Other Alternative Protein Sources For Use In Livestock Feed 

Edited by 
Professor Xin Gen Lei, Cornell University, USA 
 
About the Book 
 
With traditional sources of protein considered as major contributors to climate change, there is growing interest in establishing alternative, more ‘climate-smart’ sources of protein. 
 
This title summarises current advances in utilising macroalgae and microalgae as alternative sources of proteins. 
 
It reviews processes of protein formation in macroalgae and microalgae, macroalgae farming and processing as well as microalgae bioprocessing. Chapters also discuss the practical application of seaweed as an alternative protein source in ruminant, pig, poultry and fish diets. 
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

News 

rumen development, rumen function, dairy cattle
The importance of good rumen development in dairy calves 
 
Efficient rumen function in dairy cows is integral to overall cow performance and health. However, this is arguably even more important in dairy calves as rumen function potential can be reduced significantly which can hinder cow development. With this at stake, several studies have set out to identify feed ingredients that can complement the rumen and have a positive impact on cow growth performance and rumen associated processes, e.g. rumen fermentation. [Read more here]. 
 
meat quality, pig meat
Improving the quality of pork 
 
Quality of meat incorporates the following elements: flavour, texture, colour and appearance. With consumer expectation as high as it is, producers worldwide are faced with the challenge of ensuring these quality traits are met, whilst also ensuring the welfare of the animal isn't compromised. A new article has explored how pork producers are achieving these requirements, looking primarily at the crucial role lipids play in determining whether an animal will produce high or low quality meat.  
[Read more here]. 
 
white striping, chicken
Large majority of US supermarket chicken affected by white striping 
 
A new study completed by The Humane League has determined that around 99% of all store-brand chicken sold by some of the major food superstores in the US have evidence of white striping. White striping is a muscle disease that occurs when poultry are bred for fast growth, which leads to a far higher fat content and lower protein levels when compared to a chicken bred at a more normal, natural rate. Despite not being a risk to human health, The Humane League are keen to emphasise the animal welfare issues white striping indicate. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Poultry meat quality: an overview 
carbon neutral dairy production, sustainable agriculture
Marin County, California to be carbon-neutral by 2030? 
 
A recent panel organised by the Marin Agricultural Land Trust (MALT) has determined that carbon-neutral (or carbon negative) dairy production and farming is highly achievable within the region by 2030. The panel included an array of experts from industry and academia who were able to come to the conclusion unanimously. A key discussion point was the role of seaweed-based feed and feed additives in reducing methane production in dairy cows. [Read more here]. 
 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
30 September 2021 

Using Machine Learning to Grow More With Less 

machine learning, maize
Agriculture faces many challenges, including the need to increase agricultural outputs (yield), whilst simultaneously reducing inputs (fertilisers, pesticides). 
 
Researchers from New York University, USA have recently completed a revolutionary study which used machine learning to uncover and identify key genes which enhance a plant's ability to grow more efficiently with less fertiliser. 
 
Machine learning is a classification of artificial intelligence and is typically used in research to detect patterns in data. The researchers utilised machine learning to demonstrate how certain genes can determine whether a plant is efficiently or inefficiently using nitrogen. 
 
Nitrogen is a key component in many fertilisers due to its ability to increase plant growth and overall health. Crops that therefore use nitrogen more efficiently require less fertiliser. 
 
The researchers focussed their study on two plant species: Arabidopsis and corn. 
 
Read the full article here

Key Reference on a More Resource-efficient Agriculture 

Edited by 
Professor Zed Rengel, University of Western Australia, Australia 
 
Key Features 
 
• Focus on integrating research on nutrient cycling, crop nutrient processing and the environmental impact of fertiliser use to identify ways of improving nutrient use efficiency (NUE) in the use of particular fertilisers 
• Includes research on a range of secondary macronutrients and micronutrients including: calcium, magnesium, zinc, boron, manganese and molybdenum 
• Reviews a wide range of options for reducing/optimising current levels of fertiliser use 

AgriTech 4.0 - Crops, Seeds & Soil (CSS) 

Tech 4.0
There's less than 24 hours to go until the first day of Crops, Seeds & Soil (CSS)! 
 
We're delighted to be exhibiting at the event, however we'll also be supporting our Editorial Director who is hosting a talk on the current state of research on biostimulants and bioprotectants. 
 
Francis will be speaking in Conference Room 2 at 13:27 - don't miss it! 
 
With less than 24 hours to go, there are only a few tickets remaining! 

News 

sorghum, grain size
Boosting the potential of sorghum crops worldwide 
 
A team of researchers from The University of Queensland, Australia have discovered a selection of genes which they claim can increase the grain size of sorghum. Recognised already as one of the world's most popular crops, researchers are adamant that this new discovery can only increase the value and versatility of sorghum. An increase in grain size improves the rate of digestibility in both humans and animals, therefore improving processing efficiency. [Read more here]. 
 
sustainable pest control solutions
Developing sustainable pest control solutions 
 
With agriculture facing increasing pressure to reduce its contribution to climate change, more efforts are being directed towards the development of more sustainable practices and solutions. One emerging area of change is the way in which growers can offset yield loss as a result of insect pests. Whereas traditionally pesticides would be used as the main form of pest control, more growers are relying on biopesticides. 
[Read more here]. 
 
robotics, sustainable agriculture
Are robotics the future of sustainable agriculture? 
 
Iron Ox - an agtech start-up from the USA - has claimed that robots powered by artificial intelligence can farm far more sustainably than traditional agricultural practices. Using two robots in combination with a hydroponic system, each plant in the Iron Ox greenhouse is guaranteed the optimal levels of sunshine, water and nutrients. Iron Ox have just secured over $50 million in funding to support their mission of making the global agricultural sector completely carbon negative. 
[Read more here]. 
 
fall armyworm, FAW
Fall armyworm continues to ravage fields across the US 
 
Fall armyworm (FAW) infestations are an annual event that all farmers fear due to the pest's ability to eradicate their yields of key crops, such as rice and soybean. However, this year it isn't just farmers that are faced with FAW infestations - general homeowners in the US are victims to the pest who are destroying lawns, gardens and fields across the Northeast, Midwest, South and Southwest in under 48 hours. The presence of FAW was first reported back in June when found in Texas, USA. [Read more here]. 
 

1000 Page Reference on Current and Future Developments in IPM 

 
Edited by 
Emeritus Professor Marcos Kogan, Oregon State University, USA and Professor E. A. Heinrichs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
 
About the Book 
This volume reviews current developments in integrated pest management (IPM), focussing on insect pests. It discusses advances in understanding species and landscape ecology on which IPM is founded, as well as advances in cultural, physical and biological methods of control. 
 
Access a free sample taken directly from the book here

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
30 September 2021 

Tackling Lameness in Dairy Cattle As a Collective 

lameness, dairy cattle, dairy cattle health
As suggested by the AHDB, around one quarter of all dairy cows may experience some degree of lameness throughout their life. With the average cost of treating lameness in the region of £150 per cow, farmers can expect to pay around £15,000 for an average-sized herd's treatment. 
 
The most common causes of lameness in dairy cattle are: 
• Poor quality floors in cattle housing 
• Poor cow tracks 
• Extensive periods of standing on hardened surfaces 
• Ineffective foot trimming 
• Diseases and poor nutrition 
With lameness continuing to cause an issue for dairy farmers worldwide, a larger incentive has been placed on collaboration between key stakeholders across the dairy supply chain. 
 
This call for collaboration has also been echoed in a recent research paper which has been published in the Journal of Dairy Science. 
 
Led by researchers at the University of Minnesota, USA, the research called for greater collaboration and explored the barriers faced by different stakeholders when it comes to treating lameness. 
 
Read the full article here

Key Reference on Improving Dairy Cattle Welfare 

Edited by 
Professor Marcia Endres, University of Minnesota, USA 
 
About the Book 
This book summarises this wealth of recent research and reviews dairy cattle behaviour in areas such as cognition, learning, pain and stress. 
 
Chapters explore current welfare challenges facing the dairy industry, including the role of poor housing in the development of health conditions, including lameness and heat stress. 

From the Editor... 

We're delighted to have had Professor Marcia Endres - editor of the above book - film a short video about the book, in which she highlights the key themes that feature throughout, as well as the importance of the book for the dairy industry. 
 
Watch the video here

Key Upcoming Conference on Animal Nutrition 

4th Animal Gut Health & Nutrition Summit
The 4th Animal Gut Health & Nutrition Summit (October 12-14) will provide a unique platform for discussion between animal feed and therapeutic developers across livestock, companion animals and aquaculture industries to provide you with the scientific and practical clarity necessary to drive microbiome-targeted product innovation to the next level. 
 
Tightly focused on microbiome function and the role this has in overall animal health, our unrivalled program will be bringing together 60+ key decision makers from the likes of Elanco, Cargill, Arm & Hammer, Hill’s Pet Nutrition and many more. 
 
Find out more about the conference here

New Titles Exploring Livestock Gut Health 

Edited by 
Professor Mick Bailey and Emeritus Professor Chris Stokes, University of Bristol, UK 
 
Key Features 
 
• Provides a comprehensive coverage of the key ecosystem services delivered by the gut microbiome 
• Analysis of the pig gut microbiome and its relationship with the pig gastrointestinal tract 
• In-depth focus on the techniques available to optimise gut function as a means for improving pig gut health 
Edited by 
Professor Steven C. Ricke, University of Arkansas, USA 
 
About the Book 
This collection summarises current research on the composition and function of the gastrointestinal tract in poultry, the factors that affect its function, and nutritional strategies to optimise poultry nutrition, health and environmental impact. 
 
Chapters discuss current research on the effectiveness of feed additives in optimising gut health, including probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antimicrobials, essential oils and other botanicals as well as cereal grains. 

News 

Avian influenza, AI, poultry health
Avian influenza spreads to the Czech Republic 
 
The Czech Republic's State Veterinary Administration have confirmed their first case of Avian influenza since May 2021. The report details that the outbreak occurred at a small non-commercial farm and that five geese were killed as a result of contracting the virus. As per the country's biosecurity measures, the remaining birds in the flock were culled and a protective perimeter was put in place around the farm. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Viruses affecting poultry 
 
net zero dairy farm
Nestlé's first net zero dairy farm in two years? 
 
Internationally-renowned food and beverage company - Nestlé - are set to have their first net zero carbon emissions dairy farm by 2023 if the farm continues to partake in the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices. The Skimmelkrans Dairy Farm can be found in South Africa's Western Cape province and has managed to achieve its status through the farm's dedication to acting on the four pillars of regenerative agriculture.  
[Read more here]. 
 
SBM, alternatives to SBM, pig gut health
Exploring alternatives to soybean meal 
 
Despite being a great source of protein, many farmers are sourcing alternative options to soybean meal (SBM) as a result of many issues, including the constant fluctuation of the cost of SBM. A new series of articles set to be published by Pig Progress over the next few weeks will detail the top five known alternatives to SBM. The first article in the series is dedicated to canola and other oilseed meals. [Read more here]. 
 
poultry shortages, poultry slaughter
Poultry shortages threaten UK market 
 
This week saw gas prices in the UK rise drastically. As a result, two of the largest fertiliser plants in the UK have temporarily stalled all operations, citing any further production as not commercially viable. This closure is already having a monumental knock-on effect on the UK poultry sector as the primary by-product produced by these plants (carbon dioxide) is used by farmers and producers as a means to stun their birds before slaughter. [Read more here]. 
 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
23 September 2021 

Quantifying Agricultural Sustainability 

sustainable agriculture, agricultural sustainability
As a result of growing concerns surrounding agriculture's contribution to climate change, there has been a great shift towards the adoption of more sustainable farming practices that have the potential to reduce the sector's carbon footprint. 
 
A new challenge which has risen as a result of this shift is the ability to model and measure agricultural sustainability. However, a team of researchers from the Center for Environmental Science at the University of Maryland, USA have developed a new tool which they claim can provide an accurate assessment of a nation's agricultural sustainability. 
 
The tool - recognised as the Sustainable Agriculture Matrix, or SAM - is equipped to provide independent and transparent measurements at a national level that can assist governments and local organisations with their ability to monitor the rate of sustainability, as well as inform policies and actions towards achieving sustainable agriculture on a national and international scale. 
 
Read more about this new study here

Over 100 Titles on Sustainable Agriculture 

In case you may have missed it, with the publication of Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock production back in July, our Agriculture Science series reached over 100 titles! 
 
Our titles cover an array of key themes across agriculture, encompassing the major trends and developments in: 
 
• Crop science (Horticulture, arable, beverage, etc) 
• Livestock science (Dairy, beef, pigs, poultry, etc) 
• Forestry science (Temperate, boreal and tropical) 
 
Download our 2021 Catalogue and browse the full collection! 
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

Our Newest Publication 

Edited by 
Professor Xin Gen Lei, Cornell University, USA 
 
About the Book 
The collection reviews processes of protein formation in macroalgae and microalgae, macroalgae farming and processing as well as microalgae bioprocessing. 
 
Chapters also discuss the practical application of seaweed as an alternative protein source in ruminant, pig, poultry and fish diets. 
 
Read a free sample from the book here

News 

Russian wheat aphid, wheat pests
Russian wheat aphid detected in Australia 
 
The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) have confirmed the presence of Russian wheat aphids (RWA) in barley and wheat crops in the Kwinana, Albany and Esperance zones. This is the first time RWA has been detected north of the Great Eastern Highway since August 2020, however DPIRD scientists, alongside other crop monitoring experts have determined the outbreak to be manageable. 
[Read more here]. 
 
bananas, banana cultivation, TR4
New report explores best practices for managing TR4 
 
A newly commissioned report has assessed the current state of Panama disease tropical race 4 (Panama TR4), as well as the areas of research which can be further explored to assist the global banana industry in their mission to manage the disease and reduce its spread. The 2021 Panama TR4 Epidemiological Review outlines the importance of collaboration between industry and government and their role in the development of cost-effective solutions. [Read more here]. 
 
oil palm, oil palm production
Oil palm production to cause even more deforestation? 
 
The Indian government have recently approved the launch of a 'National Mission on Palm Oil' which will see the country lose their status as the biggest importers of the crop, however will see them emerge as a major producer. This announcement has come with some criticism, with many concerned that increasing oil palm production will come at the cost of large-scale deforestation of ecologically sensitive areas. [Read more here]. 
 
soil health, agricultural soils
Best practices for improving soil health 
 
The University of Western Australia's resident soil health expert - Emerita Professor Lynette Abbott - is impressed with the nation's farmers intent to improve their uptake of sustainable farming practices, however emphasises that managing and improving soil health still remains out of grower's remits. To tackle this, she has published 'Ten tips for a healthy soil' which she hopes will provide a simple and accessible solution for farmers and growers to improve the health of their soils. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Book: Improving soil health 

Looking Ahead to October... 

 
Edited by 
Professor Richard Oliver, formerly Curtin University, Australia 
 
Key Features 
 
• Provides an authoritative review of the key developments in achieving durable disease resistance in cereal crops 
• Comprehensive coverage of the major diseases that affect cereal crops (leaf rust, Fusarium head blight, Septoria tritici blotch, tan spot, powdery mildew) 
• Assesses the key challenges in breeding durable disease-resistant cereals faced globally 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
23 September 2021 

Newly Formed Coalition Calls for Improved Poultry Product Safety 

poultry, poultry safety, poultry health
Several entities involved in the poultry industry, including academics, consumer groups and poultry companies have joined forces in a new effort which calls for improved measures to ensure the safety of poultry products. 
 
The coalition includes the support of major food outfits, such as Tyson Foods and Perdue Farms, with its primary aim of securing a meeting with the US Agriculture Secretary - Tom Vilsack. 
 
If a meeting is secured with Vilsack, the coalition will make a concerted attempt to enforce the development of a modernised, scientific-based regulatory approach which can ensure the food safety of key poultry products, including eggs and meat. 
 
With the treatment of major zoonotic diseases, such as Salmonella and Campylobacter, costing the US over $6 billion annually, there is a growing need to tackle the source of the problem through reducing the risk of disease in flocks. 
 
Read the full article here

Key Reference on Improving Poultry Flock Health 

Edited by 
Professor Sjaak de Wit, University of Utrecht and Royal GD, The Netherlands 
 
About the Book 
This book reviews the wealth of recent research on the mechanisms of transmission for infectious diseases, such as Avian Influenza (AI), and how our understanding of this transmission can be used to improve poultry flock health. 
 
This collection considers how improved surveillance, testing, diagnostics and nutritional strategies can be used as preventative measures, as well as how bird health can be optimised at the differing stages of production. 

Quantifying Agricultural Sustainability 

agricultural sustainability, sustainable agriculture
As a result of growing concerns surrounding agriculture's contribution to climate change, there has been a great shift towards the adoption of more sustainable farming practices that have the potential to reduce the sector's carbon footprint. 
 
A new challenge which has risen as a result of this shift is the ability to model and measure agricultural sustainability. However, a team of researchers from the Center for Environmental Science at the University of Maryland, USA have developed a new tool which they claim can provide an accurate assessment of a nation's agricultural sustainability. 
 
The tool - recognised as the Sustainable Agriculture Matrix, or SAM - is equipped to provide independent and transparent measurements at a national level that can assist governments and local organisations with their ability to monitor the rate of sustainability, as well as inform policies and actions towards achieving sustainable agriculture on a national and international scale. 
 
Read more about this new study here

Over 100 Titles on Sustainable Agriculture 

In case you may have missed it, with the publication of Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock production back in July, our Agriculture Science series reached over 100 titles! 
 
Our titles cover an array of key themes across agriculture, encompassing the major trends and developments in: 
 
• Crop science (Horticulture, arable, beverage, etc) 
• Livestock science (Dairy, beef, pigs, poultry, etc) 
• Forestry science (Temperate, boreal and tropical) 
 
Download our 2021 Catalogue and browse the full collection! 
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

News 

feed quality, pig feed
Improving feed quality and performance in pigs 
 
Oxidation in pig feed can be a massive issue for swine producers if not avoided as it can impact the sensory and nutritional characteristics of the feed, thus implicating the health and performance of the pig. A new article has addressed the growing issue of oxidation in pig feed and the potential role antioxidants can play in delaying the process. Chemical antioxidants are added to feed to reduce the risk of oxidation, preserve feed quality and shelf-life. [Read more here]. 
 
poultry health, poultry nutrition
New unit dedicated to poultry health and nutrition opened 
 
Trouw Nutrition have recently announced the grand opening of a new unit in Spain which will support research which focusses on supporting poultry flock health and performance without the need for antibiotics. The new Poultry Nutrition and Health Unit is the latest addition to the Trouw Nutrition Poultry Centre and will enable researchers to replicate a variety of environmental conditions to measure the effects on animal behaviour, health and welfare. [Read more here]. 
 
reducing methane emissions, GHG livestock production
New study explores reducing methane emissions 
 
A team of researchers from the Center for Quantitative Genetics and Genomics, Aarhus University, Denmark have recently published findings which emphasise the need to include methane in breeding goals if global methane emissions are to be reduced. The aim of the study was to estimate the genetic parameters of seven methane traits, as well as any genetic correlations between methane traits and production, maintenance and efficiency traits. [Read more here]. 
 
GHG emissions, livestock production
The Netherlands' plan for reducing GHG emissions 
 
 
With growing concerns surrounding agriculture's contribution to climate change, most countries - if not all - have been informed that they must reduce their individual contribution of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. For The Netherlands, who are recognised as one of Europe's largest livestock industries, this is not an easy task. However, government representatives have drafted a proposal to reduce GHG emissions through decreasing the livestock population by 30%. [Read more here]. 
 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
16 September 2021 

New Title on Seaweed as an Alternative Protein Source 

Edited by 
Professor Xin Gen Lei, Cornell University, USA 
 
Key Features 
• Summarises current advances in the use of seaweed and microalgae as alternative sources of protein primarily in the livestock sector 
• Provides an authoritative assessment on the need for alternative protein/energy sources in the agricultural market 
• Highlights the adaptability of seaweed/macroalgae for use across different diets (e.g. human, ruminant, swine, poultry, marine) 
What Others Are Saying... 
 
"One of the greatest challenges we face in the 21st century is to provide an affordable, nutritionally balanced, safe and sustainable food supply for a growing global population. To meet this challenge, we must develop novel food and nutrient sources to complement traditional foods. Seaweed and microalgae have great untapped potential as sources of high quality protein and other nutrients. This book provides a comprehensive review of this potential written by leading authorities in the field." 
 
Professor Dennis D. Miller, Cornell University, USA 

UK University Launches Vertical Farming Trials 

vertical farming, horticulture, hydroponics, indoor farming
Harper Adams University, UK have formed a partnership with Vertically Urban - a UK-based lighting company to explore the potential of utilising vertical farming technology. 
 
The project is being part-funded by the Department of Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and will be held at Harper Adams' Jean Jackson Glass House that was built in early 2016. 
 
Researchers working on the project will pair lettuce cultivars with varying conditions to assess the path from seedling to plant and the role of varying lighting in this process. 
 
Read the full article here
BDS Related Book 
 
Discover our specially curated collection which features five reviews of current and key research on vertical farming in horticulture. 
 
Chapters evaluate technologies and methods for growing edible plants indoors and explores the most recent advances in hydroponic technologies for plant cultivation. 
 
Price: £37.99 
Pages: 144 
Publication Date: 8th December 2020 

Two New Open Access Chapters Published 

Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

News 

mangoes, mango cultivation
New varieties of mango set for development 
 
The Queensland Department of Agriculture (DAF) have announced the official takeover of three new mango hybrids produced by the National Mango Breeding Programme (NMBP). Before DAF's involvement, the project had stalled with the next commercial phase seemingly far away. However, with DAF now on board, the project is set to move onto the commercial development phase within the next two months.  
[Read more here]. 
 
soil health
UK Government commits to improving soil health 
 
Earlier this week, the UK Government announced that they are set to publish a soil health action plan (SHAPE) which aims to revitalise the health of England's soils. The new plan was announced last Wednesday during a debate in the House of Lords. Soil Association - a UK-based organisation - have hailed the announcement as a massive step in the right direction for soil health. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Soil and soil health: an overview 
soybeans, soybean disease, crop management, plant diseases
Protecting soybean plants against major disease 
 
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba, Japan have developed an anti-rust coating for soybean plants that is claimed to protect the crop against major fungal disease. Researchers working on the project announced that the coating, which contains cellulose nanofiber (CNF), changed a number of elements, including changing leaf surfaces from water repellent to water absorbent, as well as supressing the pathogen gene associated with infection mechanisms. [Read more here]. 
 
maize, greenhouse cultivation, wheat
Developing resilient varieties of wheat and maize 
 
The use of controlled environments for growing crops is rising across agriculture, partly because of its potential in securing future global food security. The International Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) centre have recently opened a new R&D greenhouse which utilises recent technologies to identify and develop new varieties of wheat and maize. The new facility relies on the Ridder HortiMaX-Go! which runs using an adaptive control system that controls growing conditions. 
[Read more here]. 
 

What's News to Instant Insights? 

Instant Insights

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
16 September 2021 

New Title on Seaweed as an Alternative Protein Source 

Edited by 
Professor Xin Gen Lei, Cornell University, USA 
 
Key Features 
• Summarises current advances in the use of seaweed and microalgae as alternative sources of protein primarily in the livestock sector 
• Provides an authoritative assessment on the need for alternative protein/energy sources in the agricultural market 
• Highlights the adaptability of seaweed/macroalgae for use across different diets (e.g. human, ruminant, swine, poultry, marine) 
What Others Are Saying... 
 
"One of the greatest challenges we face in the 21st century is to provide an affordable, nutritionally balanced, safe and sustainable food supply for a growing global population. To meet this challenge, we must develop novel food and nutrient sources to complement traditional foods. Seaweed and microalgae have great untapped potential as sources of high quality protein and other nutrients. This book provides a comprehensive review of this potential written by leading authorities in the field." 
 
Professor Dennis D. Miller, Cornell University, USA 

Genetically Modified Soybean Supports India's Poultry Sector 

SBM, poultry, poultry feed
In recent years, the price of soybean meal (SBM) in India has risen drastically primarily due to domestic shortage. As a result of this price increase, farmers and producers of poultry have sourced alternative feed ingredients, including canola meal, pulses, insect meal, brewer's spent grains, as well as single-cell proteins for use as poultry feed. 
 
In addition to this challenge, the Indian poultry sector have also been faced with serious outbreaks of avian influenza. 
 
With the average price of a kilogram of SBM rising from $0.46 to $1.29 in in the past five years, the recent announcement that 15mt of genetically modified soybeans have been approved for import into the country by the Department of Animal Husbandry will come as great news to farmers and poultry producers across the country. 
 
Read the full article here
BDS Related Book 
 
Discover our new title Developing animal feed products which explores the increasingly complex challenges faced by the livestock sector, including the need to develop feed/feed ingredients which improve digestibility and efficiency, whilst also promoting growth and enhancing product quality and safety. 
 
Access a quick look into this new title here
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

BCVA Congress 2021 

 
We are delighted to be a Media Partner for the upcoming British Cattle Veterinary Association (BCVA) Congress, 14-16th October 2021, Newport, Wales. 
 
The conference will discuss key trends and themes across the dairy and beef sector, including sessions on: 
 
• The future of farm animal practice 
• New approaches to controlling Johne's disease in dairy herds 
• Wellbeing of dairy and beef farmers 
• Integrated parasite management 
• The role of regenerative agriculture in beef/cattle farming 
 
Download the Conference Programme here

News 

reducing methane emissions, GHG emissions, animal feed
Reducing methane emissions with feed additives 
 
Royal DSM have announced that they have received full regulatory approval from the necessary Brazilian and Chilean authorities to make their new feed additive - Bovaer - available for purchase and use in dairy and beef cattle diets. This news come after a successful round of trials in Australia this year, which saw methane emissions produced by beef cattle decrease by up to 90% after receiving the additive. [Read more here]. 
 
 
salmonella, campylobacter, zoonoses, poultry
Mitigating the risk of Salmonella and Campylobacter 
 
A new article has emphasised the importance of performing anti-microbial interventions during the slaughter of poultry to avoid cross-contamination of foodborne pathogens, such as Salmonella and Campylobacter. Despite not causing any harm to the bird, these pathogens can be extremely detrimental to humans. For example, approximately 120 people died in the US in 2018 as a result of exposure to foodborne pathogens. The article explores the impact of pH on the efficacy of peroxy acetic acid in tackling disease. [Read more here]. 
 
antibiotic use, pigs, pig production
Current state of antibiotic use in the EU 
 
With concerns surrounding the over-reliance on the use of antibiotics and the consequent development of antimicrobial resistance, the global livestock sector have committed themselves to reducing their use. However, a recent article by Pig Progress has highlighted the impact of different regional approaches - combined with the EU's One Health Action Plan Against Antimicrobial Resistance - on the speed antibiotic reduction can be achieved. [Read more here]. 
 
poultry, poultry production, poultry nutrition
Alternative sources of protein for poultry 
 
As a result of growing concerns surrounding the availability of soya, a new study - led by UK farmers - has investigated the utilisation of alternative protein sources, such as sprouting wheat, vetch seeds and grain tailings. The study determined that all of the above alternatives are suitable for consumption as they offer good alternative nutrients for monogastrics and can also be grown throughout UK farming systems. [Read more here]. 
 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
09 September 2021 

Mitigating Agriculture's Contribution to Climate Change 

biodiversity, conservation agriculture, CA, climate change
In his latest address, Qu Dongyu - the Director General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) - emphasised the crucial role collaboration between key stakeholders across the agri-food supply chain has on the sector's ability to reduce it's carbon footprint and overall contribution to climate change. 
 
Global food systems and production have been recognised as significant causes for the loss of biodiversity, soil degradation and deforestation. 
 
The FAO remain at the forefront of tackling this challenge through their worldwide promotion of more sustainable practices which are claimed to benefit the climate, whilst not compromising food production and crop yield. 
 
Advocating for the implementation of more sustainable practices - such as Conservation Agriculture which focusses on improving soil health - the Director General is confident that the agricultural sector can reduce its contribution to climate change and offer a real solution to the global environmental crisis. 
 
Read the full article here
 
See what Qu Dongyu - the Director General of the FAO - has to say about our collection on Conservation Agriculture below! 

Three-Volume Collection on the Advances in Conservation Agriculture 

Advances in Conservation Agriculture
About the Book - Volume 1 
This volume reviews the latest research on ways of optimising no-till techniques to minimise soil disturbance in relation to seeding, weeding and other operations. 
 
About the Book - Volume 2 
This collection reviews ways of optimising Conservation Agricultural (CA) practices and their benefits and summarises research on optimising soil management, crop nutrition and irrigation, as well as weed, insect pest and disease management. 
 
About the Book - Volume 3 
The final volume in this collection reviews the effectiveness of CA in differing contexts (e.g. in drier conditions where water conservation is important or in areas with poor soil) and refers to the wealth of research and experiential evidence currently available. 
From the Director General of the FAO... 
 
"This edifying book is a compendium of much of what we have learnt across the world about CA. Its authors have all been deeply and enthusiastically involved in one way or another in the remarkable evolution and spread of Conservation Agriculture in recent decades. It will serve as an immensely valuable source of reference – and inspiration - for all those who are committed to putting the world’s food systems on a truly sustainable footing. It is with great pleasure, therefore, that I commend this book to you." 
 
Qu Dongyu - Director General, FAO 

An Exciting Announcement... 

AgriTech 4.0
We're delighted to announce that not only will we be exhibiting at the AgriTech 4.0 - Crops, Seeds & Soil (CSS) conference, but our Editorial Director - Francis Dodds - is also speaking at the event as a senior presenter alongside 50+ industry experts. 
 
Francis is set to talk on the current state of research on biostimulants and bioprotectants and what this means for the future of agriculture. 
 
The virtual conference will take place over the course of two days: 
 
• Day 1: Conference & Exhibition (Virtual) - Friday 1st October 2021 
• Day 2: Conference & Exhibition (Virtual) - Friday 15th October 2021 
 
Find out more about the conference here and register today! 

News 

soil health, agricultural inputs, sustainable agriculture
Impact of agricultural inputs on soil health 
 
Recent years have seen a rise in farmer interest in soil health, with many now recognising the remarkable qualities of agricultural soils and how influential they can be in determining the size and quality of a crop yield. At their latest meeting, researchers from The Soil Health Institute, USA shared findings from new research on the impact of agricultural impacts - such as pesticides and herbicides - on soil health. [Read more here]. 
 
nutritional value, fruit, horticulture
Improving the nutritional value of apples 
 
A team of researchers from Ohio State University, USA have developed a new platform which contains data from over 100 different varieties of apple. The launch of this platform has been heralded as a system which could compliment current breeding practices, enabling data-driven assessments which could be used to improve the nutritional value of apples and boost the fruit's already existing health benefits. [Read more here]. 
 
climate change, maize, sustainable agriculture
Climate change to reduce maize yields significantly 
 
Previous research has highlighted that by the end of this century, maize yields could be reduced by up to 28% as a result of climate change. However, new research from the University of Illinois, USA has suggested that predicted yield loss should be much higher as existing research doesn't take into account the effects of weeds on yields. Warmer weather and drier conditions put stress on maize crops, but also prove to be prime conditions for weeds to thrive in. [Read more here]. 
 
cover crops, herbicides
Measuring cover crop response to herbicides 
 
As the end of summer nears, farmers are beginning to think about their winter crop and the potential planting of cover crops in fields currently housed by maize. A new article published by No-Till Farmer has provided a brilliant summary on the response of key cover crops, such as cereal rye, red clover and radish, to common herbicides including Atrazine, Callisto and Zidua. Crop response is measured in likelihood of injury to the cover crop. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Cover crops 

New for September 

Edited by 
Professor Xin Gen Lei, Cornell University, USA 
 
Key Features 
• Summarises current advances in the use of seaweed and microalgae as alternative sources of protein primarily in the livestock sector 
• Provides an authoritative assessment on the need for alternative protein/energy sources in the agricultural market 
• Highlights the adaptability of seaweed/macroalgae for use across different diets (e.g. human, ruminant, swine, poultry, marine) 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
09 September 2021 

Reaping the Benefits of Automated Systems in Dairy Production 

milk, dairy production, automation
Results from a recent study completed by researchers at Cornell University, USA are set to be used to encourage dairy farmers across the world to implement automated systems onto their farms. 
 
Previous research has determined that if dairy cows are prepared sufficiently for milking using a process called pre-milking stimulation (PS), the benefits are worthwhile, including faster milk flow rates and milking cows in the minimum amount of time which ultimately saves on labour costs. 
 
Most dairy farms across the world use PS, however the process is usually done by hand and is not the most efficient use of a farmer's time. 
 
As mentioned in the study, several automated pre-milking stimulation (APS) have since been developed, including machines with rotating brushes, a variety of pulsations to stimulate the cow, as well as automatic teat cleaning devices which have been claimed to also stimulate milk let-down. 
 
Read more about this here

Key Reference on Using Technology to Monitor Livestock Health and Welfare 

 
Edited by 
Professor Daniel Berckmans, Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium 
 
About the Book 
This collection provides a comprehensive review of the recent advances in the development of precision livestock technologies that use continuous, automated, real-time monitoring of animal traits to improve health, welfare and behaviour. 
 
It tackles the major issues faced by the dairy sector (mastitis, lameness and metabolic disorders) and how PLF technologies can decrease the likelihood of such diseases occurring. 
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

New Media Partnership With Key Conference on Animal Gut Health 

4th Animal Gut Health & Nutrition Summit
From the Organisers... 
 
Progressing Scientific Advances in Gut Health & Microbiome Research into Commercially Viable & Effective Nutritional & Therapeutic Solutions 
 
Products that target the animal gut microbiome for improved production efficiency, health and welfare aren’t new, but translating rapidly emerging microbiome science into effective and commercially viable products that have understood modes of action is still a significant hurdle for animal health product developers. 
 
The 4th Animal Gut Health & Nutrition Summit (October 12-14) will provide a unique platform for discussion between animal feed and therapeutic developers across livestock, companion animals and aquaculture industries to provide you with the scientific and practical clarity necessary to drive microbiome-targeted product innovation to the next level. 
 
Tightly focused on microbiome function and the role this has in overall animal health, our unrivalled program will be bringing together 60+ key decision makers from the likes of Elanco, Cargill, Arm & Hammer, Hill’s Pet Nutrition and many more. 
 
This meeting is dedicated to overcoming the important technical, commercial and regulatory hurdles to reshape your approach in translating the promise of the animal microbiome into scientifically validated real world products that improve animal health. 
 
If you would like to access our full speaker list and agenda sessions, please visit our website www.animal-gut-health-summit.com or email info@hansonwade.com for more information. 

News 

antibiotic use, livestock production, pig feed, animal feed
Russia to reduce antibiotic use in animal feed 
 
A bill which requests for tighter control over the use and addition of antibiotics to animal feed has supposedly been supported by the Russian government earlier this week. If passed, the bill will ban farmers from adding antibiotics to feed, as well as the sale of feed containing antibiotics that doesn't have the necessary accompanying license or prescription. This is the latest attempt to reduce the use of antibiotics across the livestock sector.  
[Read more here]. 
 
 
dairy cow emissions, feed efficiency
Using feed to reduce dairy cow emissions 
 
With growing public opinion on the impact of the dairy industry on the environment and its consequent contribution to climate change, researchers have been tasked with the challenge of establishing methods to reduce the sector's carbon footprint. One emerging method is the overall improvement of feed efficiency which has been shown to reduce the excretion rate of nitrogen, nitrous oxide and phosphorus. [Read more here]. 
 
seaweed, broiler diets, protein sources
Seaweed-based pellets to make headway in broiler diets? 
With traditional sources of protein considered as significant contributors to climate change, more research is being undertaken to establish alternative, more sustainable sources of protein, such as seaweed. A new study has explored the benefits of seaweed-based pellets in broiler diets. The study saw seaweed used as a natural binding agent which improved pellet quality, as well as bird performance. [Read more here]. 
 
 
farrowing, pigs, pig production
Four best tips for better results during farrowing 
 
It's been claimed that profits are made in the farrowing pens of sow farmers, as not only is it the farm department which requires the most attention, but it is also where the biggest differences can be made. For example, recent research has shown that sows with a higher feed intake in the farrowing pen lead to a higher milk yield and as a result, higher weaning piglet weights. These tips include: feeding at various points during the day, as well as feeding in smaller portions. [Read more here]. 
 

New for September 

Edited by 
Professor Xin Gen Lei, Cornell University, USA 
 
Key Features 
• Summarises current advances in the use of seaweed and microalgae as alternative sources of protein primarily in the livestock sector 
• Provides an authoritative assessment on the need for alternative protein/energy sources in the agricultural market 
• Highlights the adaptability of seaweed/macroalgae for use across different diets (e.g. human, ruminant, swine, poultry, marine) 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
02 September 2021 

Improving Current Practices for Measuring Soil Health 

soil health, measuring soil health, sustainable agriculture
Scientists from the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) have collaborated with a team from the world-renowned Soil Health Institute in North Carolina, USA to assess one of the most commonly used methods (carbon dioxide flush) to measure soil health in dryland cropping systems. 
 
Instead of developing a new method to measure soil health in its entirety, the team of researchers worked to refine the carbon dioxide flush method to ensure a close association with the majority of known soil properties and successful future crop production. 
 
With more farmers and producers paying close attention to the health of their soils and what the presence of particular soil properties can indicate, the importance of soil health assessments and testing is growing. However, to receive a comprehensive outlook, most farmers and producers rely on several different testing methods which generally amounts to an expensive investment. 
 
Research similar to that carried out by scientists from the USDA-ARS and The Soil Health Institute is important to the future development and/or further refinement of existing soil health assessment methods. 
 
Read more about this research here

Important Reference on the Advances Made in Measuring Soil Health 

Edited by 
Professor Wilfred Otten, Cranfield University, UK 
 
About the Book 
This book reviews the wealth of research on developing better analytical techniques for measuring the biological, physical and chemical properties of soils and their implications for better management of farm soils. 
 
The collection also surveys developments in measuring soil physical properties through advances in visual, imaging and geophysical techniques, as well as the methods used to measure chemical properties such as soil organic carbon. 

Brose the Full Soil Health Collection 

Soil health collection

Stay Updated What's Coming Next... 

 
Download our New Titles Brochure to stay on top of our publication schedule* and bookmark which titles you're most looking forward to! 
 
Key Forthcoming Titles: 
 
 
*Publication dates subject to change. 

News 

integrated weed management, no-till farming, herbicide
No-till farmers can reduce herbicide use 
 
A team of researchers from Pennsylvania State University, USA have suggested that farmers partaking in no-till farming practices can reduce their current herbicide use, whilst still controlling weeds and maintaining crop yields. The new study emphasises how farmer implementation of integrated weed management strategies is key to achieving this, as well as reducing the environmental impact of crop production. [Read more here]. 
 
GMO crops, GMO wheat
Field trial for genome edited wheat set to go ahead 
 
Rothamsted Research - a renowned institute in the UK for their work on genetically modified (GM) crops - have been granted permission by the UK government to organise a series of field trials of GM wheat. Recognised as the first set of field trials of CRISPR edited wheat across the UK and Europe, the crop has been edited to reduce the natural production of asparagine. When used in cooking, asparagine converts into acrylamide which is suggested to be harmful for humans. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Genome editing of barley 
sorghum, drought resilience
New initiative launched to promote sorghum 
 
Researchers from an array of US institutions and organisations, including The United Sorghum Checkoff Program (USCP) and the University of California, have teamed up together on a five year partnership which will aim to promote the versatility of the sorghum crop and it's resilience to drought. Research efforts will also focus on increasing the demand for sorghum as a beneficial crop for use across the biofuel and bioproduct markets.  
[Read more here]. 
 
fruit, postharvest, disease threat
Offering fruit postharvest protection 
 
A new partnership between Hazel Technologies Inc. and Valicoff Fruit Co. has shown great promise for the postharvest protection of apples and stone fruits, such as peaches, apricots and cherries. During last year's growing season, leading farmers working at Valicoff Fruit utilised Hazel 100™ bin sachets to ensure the quality of their harvest wasn't reduced upon transport from field to storage facility. [Read more here]. 
 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
02 September 2021 

EU Grants the Use of Processed Animal Proteins in Pig and Poultry Feed 

pigs, animal proteins, PAPs
The European Union (EU) Commission have authorised the use of processed animal proteins (PAPs) and insects as feed for non-ruminant farmed animals, including pigs and poultry. 
 
This authorisation by the Commission has been hailed as another huge step towards developing and maintaining a more sustainable feed chain, something that was outlined previously in the Farm to Fork strategy. 
 
Throughout the EU, the use of PAPs as primary or secondary feed ingredients for animals had been banned since 2001 - a direct result of the Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) outbreak in 2001. However, in 2013, the ban was lifted on the use of PAPs in fish feed. 
 
Members from the EU Commissions have credited the importance of research and other forms of scientific knowledge in the creation of this proposal, as well as the eventual authorisation of it. 
 
Read more about this new development here

Key Reference on the Development of New Animal Feed Products and Ingredients 

 
Edited by 
Dr Navaratnam Partheeban, formerly Royal Agricultural University, UK 
 
About the Book 
This volume reviews key research and the challenges faced in developing new livestock feed products that promote growth whilst also enhancing both product quality and safety. 
 
It also summarises recent key developments in the sector, including a better understanding of gut function and the need to replace antibiotics. 

New Insights Into the Effect of Heat Stress on Calves 

heat stress, dairy cattle
With rising concerns from both consumers and retailers about the welfare of all farmed animals, greater efforts are being made by farmers and producers to ensure good animal welfare standards are maintained. 
 
Heat stress in dairy cows remain a huge welfare concern and researchers from the University of Florida, USA are the latest to detail the negative effects heat stress can have on a cow's health and lifespan, as well as the impact heat stress can have on a calf. 
 
In a controlled study, researchers from the University of Florida exposed a herd of pregnant Holstein cows to extreme temperatures (made possible by the Floridian heat) and collected data on the health of the calves after birth. This data was then compared with data collected from pregnant Holstein cows who were provided with cooling measures towards the latter stages of their pregnancies. 
 
Key findings show that calves born to heat-stressed cows had: 
• Lower birth weights 
• Reduced weight of major organs (heart, liver and kidneys) 
• Higher rates of cell death in the intestine 
 
Read more about this new study here
BDS Related Book 
 
Discover Heat stress in dairy cattle to improve your current knowledge on the wealth of recent research completed on the latest practices and techniques developed to offset the occurrence of heat stress in dairy cattle. 
 
Price: £37.99 
Publication Date: 8th December 2020 
Pages: 92 

News 

avian influenza, poultry, poultry disease
Potential outbreak of avian influenza identified in Botswana 
 
Local animal health authorities based in Botswana have been alerted to a potential case of avian influenza in a backyard poultry farm in Bokka - a village in the Kgatleng district. Since the notification, the country's Ministry of Agricultural Development and Food Security have halted the transportation of live poultry and poultry products in and out of the village until further notice.[Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Viruses affecting poultry 
 
pig welfare, animal welfare, pig production
Achieving high welfare standards in pig production 
 
A new article has highlighted the relationship between animal welfare and performance, suggesting that when high welfare standards are met, animals respond with greater levels of productivity and performance. High welfare standards for piglets can be achieved through ensuring easy access to food and water, enabling movement in and around the housing environment, as well as a good relationship between human and animal.  
[Read more here]. 
 
sheep diseases, ovine enzootic abortion
Tackling ovine enzootic abortion in sheep 
 
 
A team of researchers from the Moredun Research Institute, UK have developed a new vaccine which is claimed to be more effective than any previous vaccine against the threat of ovine enzootic abortion. The bacteria responsible for this disease can also be extremely harmful to humans, with the development of life-threatening illnesses and abortions a possibility if exposed for a certain amount of time. [Read more here]. 
 
 
dairy cattle, methane emissions, livestock production
Emissions from New Zealand's dairy farms continue to rise 
 
New Zealand is home to just over 6 million cows and recent statistics from Stats NZ have declared that the country's population of dairy cows has increased greenhouse gas emissions by 3% in 2019 alone. Dairy farms across New Zealand recorded a total of 17,719 kilotonnes of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere during 2019, an amount just shy of the total contribution of the whole agricultural sector. [Read more here]. 
 

Stay Updated With What's Coming Next... 

 
Download our New Titles Brochure to stay on top of our publication schedule* and bookmark which titles you're most looking forward to! 
 
Key Forthcoming Titles: 
 
 
*Publication dates subject to change. 

Title Insights 

 
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