NEWSLETTERS 
Co-Founders Rob Burleigh and Francis Dodds share their knowledge and insights into agricultural science, publishing and the latest news at Burleigh Dodds 
To keep up to date with the release of new titles and business announcements, register for our weekly video newsletters. 
Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
28 July 2022 

New Research Promoting Cage-free Housing for Laying Hens Receives Funding 

cage-free housing, poultry welfare
In recent years, there has been a spike in consumer interest in ensuring that the welfare needs and demands of farmed animals, including chickens, are met. 
 
A major welfare concern throughout the sector was its reliance on battery cages which are known to restrict bird movement and agility. 
 
In the UK, battery cages are now illegal, however many birds around the globe are still reared using this practice. In July of last year, the European Parliament voted to ban the use of battery cages by 2027. 
 
Dr Michael Toscano* - an animal welfare scientist based at the University of Bern in Switzerland - has received over $2 million in funding to support his research into enhancing the breeding of laying hens. 
 
The project - titled HenTrack 2.0 - will utilise findings from recent behavioural studies completed on cage-free hens in an array of environments, spanning from inside enclosures, to outdoor areas. 
 
These findings will be utilised by Dr Toscano and his team to breed more robust and resistant laying hens which prosper in cage-free environments. 
 
Read more about this new research here
 

Key Title Considers Using Behaviour As a Determinant for Welfare in Chickens 

 
Edited by 
Professor Christine Nicol, Royal Veterinary College – University of London, UK 
 
About the Book 
This book offers a comprehensive summary on the wealth of recent research completed on understanding chicken behaviour and discusses how best to use this rich body of knowledge to optimise welfare management of broilers and layers. 
 
It features expert insights into the use of wearable, video and acoustic technologies as a means of monitoring behaviour, as well as improving current welfare protocols. 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

Our Latest Title! 

Edited by 
Professor Daniel Berckmans, Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium 
 
Key Features 
• Provides a comprehensive review of the recent developments in precision livestock technologies, from wearable sensors, to thermal imaging techniques 
• Covers the latest research on the application of precision livestock technologies in monitoring livestock health 
• Highlights the potential of precision livestock technologies to reduce the environmental impact of livestock production 

News 

alternative feed ingredients, yeast
Utilising yeast as a feed supplement in dairy cow diets 
 
In recent years, many farmers and producers have turned to supplementing the diets of their livestock with an array of additives to boost production, animal health and profits. A new article has explored the recent development of using yeast as a feed supplement in the diets of dairy cows. As a feed supplement, yeast has previously proven to boost milk yield and improve rumen fermentation, animal health and the cow's ability to adapt to heat stress. [Read more here]. 
 
acoustic technologies, music, pig behaviour
Study to assess if pig behaviour can be influenced by music 
 
As a result of claims made by a Belgian pig farmer that the behaviour of his pigs can be influenced by music, a team of scientists from the Agricultural Research and Training Center, Belgium have focussed the attention of their new research study on determining whether this can be proven. There is a sparsity of research on how pigs respond to music, however previous studies have demonstrated how sounds and their volume levels can impact animals. [Read more here]. 
 
AI, poultry disease detection
Using Artificial Intelligence to detect distress in poultry 
 
A team of researchers from City University, Hong Kong have developed a new tool which utilises Artificial Intelligence (AI) to identify the level of distress a chicken is experiencing. The deep learning tool is equipped with the ability to identify when bird calls are a sign of distress, as opposed to a means of communication throughout the flock. This is made possible through the researchers pre-recording distress calls of poultry and using AI technology to identify when similar tonal calls are made. [Read more here]. 
 
mycotoxins, pig feed, pig performance
New research reviews the impact of mycotoxins on pig growth 
 
An international team of researchers featuring representatives from DSM, The Netherlands, and the National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment, France have collaborated on a new research project to assess the impact of emerging mycotoxins on pig growth performance. The researchers recorded the short-term effects of key emerging mycotoxins, such as beauvericin, enniatin B and B1, as well as when combined with the regulated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol. 
[Read more here]. 
 

New for August... 

Edited by 
Professor Sjaak de Wit, Royal GD and University of Utrecht, The Netherlands 
 
Key Features 
• Provides an authoritative review on recent research undertaken on understanding the mechanisms of transmission of major poultry diseases (Avian Influenza, Salmonella) 
• Reviews best practices for preventing and/or controlling disease outbreaks in poultry, including health monitoring, vaccinations and improved biosecurity measures 
• Considers how bird health can be optimised at multiple stages of production, focussing on chicks, broilers, layers and breeders 

Title Insights 

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Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
28 July 2022 

New Book Considers the Role of Seed Science in Mitigating the Effects of Climate Change 

 
Edited by 
Dr Julia Buitink, INRAE, France and Dr Olivier Leprince, L'institut Agro – Agrocampus Ouest, France 
 
About the Book 
The book considers how an improved understanding of seed quality, germination and seedling emergence can address this challenge. 
 
Chapters in this collection review the development of new techniques to ensure seed quality control, including seed phenotyping, as well as the role of genetic and environmental factors in determining seed longevity. 
What Others Are Saying... 
 
"This seed science book edited by the two prominent scientists contains an excellent line up of proposed chapters by world experts. Bridging fundamental biology, such as modeling and longevity studies, and applied science, including seed enhancement and pathogen control, is a particular strength of this book. This book will be a great reference for both academic and industrial researchers, as well as many others involved in agriculture." 
 
Dr Hiro Nonogaki, Oregon State University, USA 

NFU Highlight the Continued Importance of Soil Health in New Report 

soil health, NFU report
The National Farmers' Union (NFU) have recently published their latest report titled 'Foundation of Food' which highlights the important role soil has in ensuring the success of British food production, as well as global food production. 
 
The new report, published this month, suggests that without investing in improving the health of the nation's soils, agriculture will not reach its net zero-related targets in the timescale put forwards. 
 
A key element to the report is its section which details the benefits soil health can bring to the environment, such as: 
 
• Promotes biodiversity 
• Supports wildlife habits of an array of species 
• Reduces flood risk 
• Promotes the sequestration and storage of carbon 
 
Read the full report here

Discover our Database of Content on Soil Health! 

Soil Health - BDS Database
Contact Us at info@bdspublishing.com to find out more! 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

sorghum pests, sorghum cultivation
Tackling aphid infestations in sorghum with a mobile app 
 
As we move deeper into the summer months and the temperatures warm, the risk of aphid infestations is that much higher. Farmers of sugarcane and soybean must be particularly vigilant during this time of year, a statement echoed by researchers from Oklahoma State University (OSU), USA. Although many crop varieties are resistant to sugarcane aphids, the aphid can still cause significant damage to sorghum crop yields. Researchers at OSU have developed a mobile application which they claim can be used to prevent and tackle aphid infestations. [Read more here]. 
 
strawberry, controlled environments, CEA
Strawberry yields double when grown in controlled environments 
 
According to recently published research from scientists at NIAB-EMR, UK, strawberry yields can be doubled if the crop is grown in a controlled environment. The study, led by NIAB's Head of Crop Protection - Dr Mark Else - produced around 3.2 kg of strawberries - a figure that was more than double the typical yield size for strawberries cultivated this time of year. Researchers involved in the study have demonstrated the potential of controlled environment agriculture and how it opens up opportunities for growing horticultural crops all year round. 
[Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Vertical farming in horticulture 
root design, hard soils
Researchers design roots to penetrate hard soils 
 
As a result of climate change, rainfall patterns are changing, meaning that crops with a strong reliance on rainfall are either dying or not coming to full fruition. However, an international team of researchers, featuring representatives from the University of Nottingham, UK and Shanghai University, China have discovered how to design the roots of specific cereal crops to enable them to grow in hard soils. Using X-ray imaging, the researchers were able to identify the key genes, hormone signals and processes in rice roots responsible for this.  
[Read more here]. 
 
sugarcane, circular agriculture
Turning sugarcane waste into organic fertiliser 
 
A new article has highlighted one woman's mission to provide Ghanaian farmers with the means necessary to make a profit, whilst also promoting sustainable agriculture. Audrey S-Darko is the CEO of Sabon Sake - a Ghanaian based outfit which recycles sugarcane waste into organic fertiliser. After purchasing the waste from sugarcane farmers, S-Darko and her team use biotechnology to develop a biofertiliser that is claimed to improve soil quality and boost crop yields, whilst also reducing crop losses. [Read more here]. 
 

New for August... 

Edited by 
Professor Victor Preedy, King's College London, UK and Dr Vinood Patel, University of Westminster, UK 
 
Key Features 
• Provides a comprehensive overview of the wealth of research on analysing, understanding and optimising the nutraceutical properties of fruit and vegetables, focussing primarily on phytochemicals/phytochemical compounds 
• Reviews the current research on mechanisms of action and the potential role of key phytochemical compounds, such as antioxidants and flavonoids, in preventing the onset of chronic diseases 
• Explores current advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of key horticultural crops, including apples, cranberries, broccoli and other brassicas 

Title Insights 

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2022 Catalogue
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Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
21 July 2022 

Leading Researchers Collaborate on New Project to Tackle Future Bird Flu Outbreaks 

poultry health, disease, bird flu
As we approach August, the UK has officially experienced its longest ever outbreak of avian influenza (bird flu). In this time, over 1000 cases of avian influenza have been detected in poultry species spanning from chickens and ducks, to geese and seabirds. 
 
In light of this, a new consortium including researchers from eight leading institutes around the UK, are set to join forces on a new government-backed research project in which they will further investigate the H5N1 strain of influenza. 
 
The project, known as FluMap, has received £1.5 million in funding from the UK government and will enable researchers to assess how the H5N1 strain has evolved in recent years and its mode of transmission onto poultry farms across the nation. 
 
The following institutes are who form the consortium: 
• Royal Veterinary College 
• University of Cambridge 
• Pirbright Institute 
• Imperial College London 
• Roslin Institute 
• University of Leeds 
• University of Nottingham 
 
Read more about the development of this consortium here

Forthcoming Title Considers Best Practices for Optimising Poultry Flock Health 

 
Edited by 
Professor Sjaak de Wit, University of Utrecht and Royal GD, The Netherlands 
 
Key Features 
• Provides an authoritative review on recent research undertaken on understanding the mechanisms of transmission of major poultry diseases (Avian Influenza, Salmonella) 
• Reviews best practices for preventing and/or controlling disease outbreaks in poultry, including health monitoring, vaccinations and improved biosecurity measures 
• Considers how bird health can be optimised at multiple stages of production, focussing on chicks, broilers, layers and breeders 
What Others Are Saying... 
 
“This impressive collection of chapters from leading international experts has been put together with care and consideration. It moves seamlessly from current knowledge of the major classes of poultry infectious diseases, through discussions on advances in methods for monitoring and prevention of disease, to bespoke considerations of best practice across different stages/parts of commercial production systems. With such breadth and depth, this volume should become a ‘go-to’ manual for anyone with an interest in poultry health." 
 
Professor Fiona Tomley, Royal Veterinary College, UK 

23rd European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition 

ESPN 2022
We're delighted to be an official Media Partner for next year's 23rd European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition! 
 
Recognised as one of the most significant forums for knowledge exchange in the field of poultry nutrition in Europe, the conference is a great opportunity for the following to attend: 
 
• Poultry research scientists 
• Practitioners 
• Students 
• Industry leaders 

News 

seaweed, alternative feed
Seaweed production receives boost with EU grant 
 
A group of 25 international organisations have received a grant of around €9 million from the European Commission's Horizon Europe Initiative. The funding will be used by the consortium to boost seaweed production - this comes as a result of a recent spike in demand for the crop. Recognised as being one of the fastest growing crops on Earth, seaweed is a multi-use crop and can be used as feed supplements in livestock diets. The consortium will utilise the funding to develop 12 innovative products using seaweed. [Read more here]. 
 
piglet welfare, health
Best practices for ensuring the health and welfare of piglets 
 
In recent years, ensuring the health and welfare of farmed animals has become paramount for farmers and producers as a result of rising consumer interest and concern. A new article published by Pig Progress has detailed how litter management can contribute to establishing a healthy environment and consequent good animal welfare. The article explores the development and use of litter conditioners during the pre-weaning stage and how its application can improve piglet survival rates. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Welfare of weaned piglets 
sheep health, sheep scab
New initiative launched to tackle sheep scab in the UK 
 
Sheep scab is considered to be one of the most financially implicating diseases of sheep, with suggestions that UK farmers shell out anywhere between £80 and £200 million annually treating it. A new initiative has been launched to tackle the rising number of sheep scab infections, whilst also raising awareness of the disease to farmers, producers and other key stakeholders across the agri-food supply chain. The initiative calls for collaboration between farmers to adopt a set of standard preventative measures. [Read more here]. 
 
methane emissions, dairy cattle production
Trial yields promising results for reducing methane emissions 
 
The longest commercial trial for the cattle feed additive - Bovaer - has recently concluded. Lasting 18 months, the trial featured collaborations from Danone, DSM and the Flanders Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Belgium. The study's focus was to measure the methane reduction effect during a cow's full lactation, as well as its impact on cow health, welfare and milk production. Key findings from the study show that Bovaer significantly reduces methane enteric emissions. 
[Read more here]. 
 

In Case You Missed It... 

Edited by 
Professor Daniel Berckmans, Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium 
 
About the Book 
The book provides a comprehensive review of recent advances in the development of precision livestock technologies to monitor the health and welfare of animals as well as key areas of production such as housing and feed efficiency. 
 
The collection includes chapters on monitoring key health issues such as mastitis, lameness and fertility together with areas such as milking and grazing management. 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

Title Insights 

Stay Updated with Our Programme! 

2022 Catalogue
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Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
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Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
21 July 2022 

New Study Reviews the Impact of Urbanisation on Local Bee Communities 

urban agriculture, pollination, pollinators
Urban agriculture is an industry that produces, processes and markets food throughout the urban and peri-urban areas within towns and cities. The most common form of urban agriculture is rooftop farming - this process sees consumers grow their own produce on the rooftops of their inhabited buildings. 
 
With concerns surrounding food security and demand, urban agriculture is increasingly being adopted by populations around the world. 
 
A team of international researchers based at the University of Göttingen, Germany the University of Hohenheim, Germany and the University of Bangalore, India have recently completed a new study which assessed the impact of urbanisation on an array of bee communities. 
 
Key findings from the study suggest that local bee populations can be protected through the adoption of urban agricultural farming practices. 
 
Read more about this research here

Key Titles Consider the Importance of Urban Agriculture and Protecting Pollinators 

Edited by 
Professor Johannes S. C. Wiskerke, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Key Features 
• Strong focus on infrastructural requirements for successful urban agriculture, such as public policy and planning frameworks, business models and social networks 
• Covers developments in key technologies such as rooftop and vertical farming, as well as waste management 
• Includes case studies of particular commodities, including horticultural produce, livestock and forestry 
Edited by 
Professor Peter Kevan and Dr Susan Willis Chan, University of Guelph, Canada 
 
About the Book 
The book reviews the wealth of research on our current understanding of existing pollination processes and their importance to our global ecosystems. 
 
Through its comprehensive exploration of the current status of pollinators in farming, the book provides its readers with the knowledge required to promote pollination by protecting the world’s pollinators species and the ecosystem services they deliver using techniques such as habitat conservation. 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

cassava, disease, cassava mosaic disease
New research tackles cassava mosaic disease head on 
 
An international team of researchers from the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, USA, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, the University of California-Los Angeles, USA and the National Crops Resources Research Institute, Uganda have collaborated on a new research study which has unveiled a genetic mutation which is responsible for developing resistance to the devastating cassava mosaic disease. Cassava is one of the world's staple food crops and is a necessity in the diets of around one billion people. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Diseases affecting cassava 
soil quality, soil health
Soil quality integral to mitigating heat stress in crops 
 
In recent years, key stakeholders across the agricultural supply chain have recognised the importance of soil health and the benefits good soil can bring. A new research study completed by scientists at Emory University, USA has focussed on assessing the impact of soil quality on a crop's ability to withstand heat stress enforced by increasing temperatures as a result of climate change. Key findings from the study suggest that a soil's capacity to hold water will be the determining factor in whether a crop can or can't withstand this stress. [Read more here]. 
 
tomatoes, late blight
New technique developed to control late blight in tomatoes 
 
Throughout the horticultural industry, late blight disease is recognised as a devastating disease in tomato and other Solanaceae crops. Already known to researchers is that resistance to leaf blight is found in particular wild species of tomato, however the mechanisms of this resistance remain a mystery. A new study led by an international team of researchers set out to assess whether the metabolic profiles of leaves taken from late-blight resistant tomato varieties could be captured and utilised throughout the breeding process as a means of controlling the disease. [Read more here]. 
 
wheat production, wheat yields
Is it possible to double global wheat production? 
 
As a result of multiple coinciding worldwide events, wheat production has been severely affected, with countries around the globe unable to import and export the crop as a result of this shortage. However, a new study led by researchers at Rothamsted Research, UK has explored how the untapped genetic potential of wheat crops can be exploited to develop new varieties of the crop which can be tailored to suit the growing conditions of particular regions. If this tailored approach is achieved, the researchers suggest that global wheat production could be doubled. [Read more here]. 
 

Review Round-Up 

We're delighted to share a review of our title Improving integrated pest management in horticulture. 
 
The review was completed by Professor Stephen N. Wegulo and published in Crop Protection. 
 
Review Excerpt 
"Improving integrated pest management in horticulture presents a comprehensive review of recent advances in knowledge and research in IPM in horticultural production. It will be a standard reference for graduate students preparing for careers in horticulture, IPM researchers in horticulture, crop pest management professionals, government agencies tasked with monitoring and regulating pesticide use in agriculture and manufacturers and suppliers of agricultural pesticides." 
 
Read the full review here

Title Insights 

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2022 Catalogue
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Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
7 July 2022 

Researchers Explore the Potential of Thermal Imaging in Livestock Health Management 

thermal imaging, livestock health
Thermal imaging is a commonly used technique throughout the human health sector, however a team of researchers from Scotland's Rural College, UK have explored whether the technique can be also be utilised throughout the agricultural sector to manage livestock health. 
 
The researchers presented their findings to an audience at the Royal Highland Show in Scotland last month, suggesting that thermal imaging could be used to improve the early detection of cross-species diseases. 
 
In addition, thermal imaging can also be used to identify whether an animal is experiencing heat stress due to its reliance on infrared radiation. 
 
A new chapter, published in our latest book Advances in precision livestock farming, reviews the use of infrared thermography as a tool in precision livestock farming to assess livestock health. 
 
Read the full article here

New Title Considers Using Technology to Monitor and Manage Livestock Health 

 
Edited by 
Professor Daniel Berckmans, Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium 
 
About the Book 
The book provides a comprehensive review of recent advances in the development of precision livestock technologies to monitor the health and welfare of animals as well as key areas of production such as housing and feed efficiency. 
 
The collection includes chapters on monitoring key health issues such as mastitis, lameness and fertility together with areas such as milking and grazing management. 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

amino acids, pig nutrition
Enhancing the quality of pork using amino acids 
 
Consumer attitudes and expectations towards the food they purchase and consume has never been more apparent. Not only are consumers more conscious of the origins of their food, they consistently expect high-quality products. When it comes to pork, the flavour, colour and texture are typically the factors which can make a product either high or low quality. A new article has explored the utilisation of amino acids as a means of enhancing the quality of pork meat. [Read more here]. 
 
Waitrose, chicken welfare
UK supermarket wins esteemed animal welfare award 
 
Waitrose - one of the UK's most popular supermarkets - have recently won Compassion in World Farming's 'Best Retailer Innovation Award' for their role in developing a mobile application which can measure the emotional wellbeing of farmed animals. Developing alongside researchers at Scotland's Rural College, the Qualitative Behaviour Assessment application was officially launched last year with the goal of improving the quality of lives all farmed animals, from pigs, to poultry.  
[Read more here]. 
 
dairy cattle nutrition, microminerals
Optimising dairy cattle nutrition using microminerals 
 
Throughout the dairy sector, the diets of millions of dairy cattle are supplemented with additional vitamins and minerals that contribute to improved animal health. However, there remains a debate surrounding the level of supplements used, as well as the sources of minerals. A new article has outlined the key microminerals used by dairy farmers and producers to optimise cow nutrition, including zinc, copper, manganese, selenium and iron. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Feed supplements for dairy cattle 
cultured meat, poultry
Cultivated meat production scaling up in South-east Asia 
 
Earlier this week, Good Meat - a spin-off brand of US-based company Eat Just, have announced that construction of a new 6000 litre bioreactor in Singapore is officially underway. This move comes nearly two years after the country first approved Good Meat's parent company's cultured chicken meat. With Singapore reliant on imports for 90% of its food, the country's key decision makers are wanting the country to be more self-sufficient and the construction of this new bioreactor is the latest step towards achieving it. [Read more here]. 
 

New Chapter Published! 

Title 
Risk-based measures for prevention and control of African swine fever (ASF) in pigs 
 
Chapter Description 
The spread of African swine fever (ASF) is causing serious economic damage in affected countries, reshaping the pig farming sector and commercial pork production and trade around the world. 
 
This chapter highlights the tools currently available for early detection of the presence of ASF and biosecurity measures to prevent its spread, including adequate cleaning and disinfection procedures. 

Title Insights 

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2022 Catalogue
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Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
7 July 2022 

We're Exhibiting at Fruit Focus 2022! 

Fruit Focus 2022
Fruit Focus is set to return to NIAB at East Malling on 13th July and we're delighted to announce that not only will we be attending the event, we'll also be exhibiting! 
 
You'll find us at Stand #600 where we will be showcasing some of our most recent publications, including: 
 
 
Pre-register for Fruit Focus free of charge and enjoy full event benefits, including the NFU Fruit Forums, the NIAB Research Tours, the new Growing Kent & Medway Sustainability Hub, as well as live demos! 

Researchers Collaborate to Improve Plant Defences Against Rising Temperatures 

climate change, crop production
Climate change is the biggest challenge agriculture has faced to date, and as a result, global crop production has never been in a more fragile state. 
 
As the planet warms and temperatures increase, extreme weather events (such as droughts) are more frequent and can compromise yield quality and quantity. 
 
However, in addition to this, rising temperatures also impact plants directly with the heat immobilising the defences of millions of plant varieties across the globe. Without these defences, these plants are extremely susceptible to attacks and infestations from pathogens and pests. 
 
A team of researchers from Duke University, USA have published the findings from a new study in which they assessed whether a plant's defences could be improved to offset the damage caused by heat. 
 
Read the full article here

Key Reference Work Assesses Impact of Climate Change on Agricultural Production 

 
Edited by 
Dr Delphine Deryng, NewClimate Institute/Integrative Research Institute on Transformations of Human-Environment Systems (IRI THESys), Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany 
 
Key Features 
• Provides a more holistic approach by combining research both on the impacts of climate change on agriculture and the contribution of agriculture to climate change 
• Highlights advances in ways of predicting the effects of agriculture and climate change on one another 
• Builds on this foundation to outline key mitigation strategies to achieve a more ‘climate-smart’ agriculture 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

integrated weed management, weeds
Implementing more effective weed management programmes 
 
In the United States alone, weeds have been estimated to cause the nation's farmers annual losses of around $33 billion. With concerns surrounding the environmental impact of herbicides, coupled with the growing problem of herbicide resistance, farmers have turned their attention to implementing integrated weed management programmes. A new study produced by researchers at Cornell University, USA has detailed the importance of timing when it comes to more effective weed control and management. [Read more here]. 
 
pollinators, bee conservation
Researchers pledge to improve bee conservation 
 
According to the publication of results from a recent study, 46 US bumblebee species have been negatively affected by changes in temperature as a result of climate change. In light of this, researchers from the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service have launched a new project in which the genomes of at least 100 species of bee will be mapped. The project - titled Beenome - will aid researchers in their efforts to distinguish which genetics improve the insect's susceptibility to climate change. [Read more here]. 
 
wheat, wheat midge
Developing new strains of wheat with resistance to wheat midge 
 
Wheat midge is one of the most economically damaging insect pests affecting wheat, with suggestions that in Canada alone the pest can cause up to $60 million in damage each year. A team of researchers from two leading Canadian universities, the University of Alberta and the University of Manitoba, are joining forces on a new research project to try and tackle these losses. The researchers are focussing their efforts on female wheat midge behaviour and what deters them from particular wheat strains. [Read more here]. 
 
vertical farming
Infarm's newest vertical farm is officially opened in the UK 
 
Infarm - a German-based vertical farming company - have announced the grand opening of their newest vertical farm in Bedford, UK. Suggested to be one of the largest vertical farms across Europe, the produce grown will be supplied to key UK clients, including Marks and Spencer, Budgens and Selfridges. Currently, the farm can produce around 500,000 plants a year, however stakeholders at Infarm suggest that if functioning at full capacity, the farm can produce around 20 million plants annually. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Vertical farming in horticulture 

In Case You Missed It... 

Our newest title, Advances in plant phenotyping for more sustainable crop production, edited by Professor Achim Walter, ETH Zurich, Switzerland is out now! 
 
Key Features 
• Comprehensive review of the development of plant phenotyping as a research field in a wide range of scientific communities 
• Explores key advances in the use of plant phenotyping techniques to improve yield, growth and resource-use efficiency, such as aerial systems and sensors 
• Offers a detailed analysis of the benefits of plant phenotyping through selected case studies that demonstrate the use of phenotyping techniques in analysing crop functionality and improving crop responses to abiotic and biotic stresses 

Title Insights 

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2022 Catalogue
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