Cereals 

Advances in breeding techniques for cereal crops Edited by Prof. Frank Ordon and Prof. Wolfgang Friedt 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Exploiting genetic diversity 
1.Alien introgression and breeding of synthetic wheat: Xiwen Cai, North Dakota State University, USA 
2.Use of the secondary gene pool of barley in breeding improved varieties: Martin Mascher, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
3.Marker-assisted trait introgression for wheat breeding & research: Alison Bentley, NIAB, UK 
 
Part 2 Double haploids (DH) 
4.Doubled haploid production in wheat: Wuletaw Tadesse, ICARDA, Lebanon 
5.Doubled haploid (DH) production for barley: Benny Wittkop, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Germany 
6.Production of doubled haploid (DH) lines for hybrid breeding in maize: Albrecht Melchinger, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
 
Part 3 Hybrid breeding 
7.Potential of hybrid breeding in wheat: Friedrich Longin , University of Hohenheim, Germany 
8.Challenges and perspectives of hybrid breeding in barley: Timm Bernhard, University of Giessen, Germany 
9.Selection strategies in hybrid rye with special consideration of fungal disease resistance: Thomas Miedaner, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
 
Part 4 High throughput phenotyping, genetic markers and QTL mapping 
10.Non-invasive phenotyping of cereal development: Andreas Hund, ETH Zurich, Switzerland 
11.Tools and application of phenotyping in wheat: Matthew Reynolds, CIMMYT, Mexico 
12.Modern technologies for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in plant research and crop breeding: Yuri Shavrukov, University of Adelaide, Australia 
13.Mapping and isolation of major resistance genes in cereals: Simon Krattinger, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia 
14.Mapping and isolation of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in cereals: Roberto Tuberosa, University of Bologna, Italy 
15.Advances in statistical methods to handle large data sets for GWAS in crop breeding: Jens Leon, University of Bonn, Germany 
16.The use of wheat and barley reference sequences in cereals breeding: Curtis Pozniak, University of Saskatchewan, Canada 
17.Nested association mapping in barley to identify extractable trait genes: Klaus Pillen, University of Halle, Germany 
 
Part 5 Genome wide association studies and genomic selection 
18.Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in wheat: Susanne Dreisigacker, CIMMYT, Mexico 
19.Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in barley: Ernesto Igartua, CSIC, Spain 
20.Genomic selection in cereals: advantages and drawbacks: Patrick Thorwarth, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
21.Use of targeted induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) populations in wheat: Peter Sharp, University of Sydney, Australia 
22.Site-directed genome modification in barley and wheat breeding: Jochen Kumlehn, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
ISBN: 9781786762443 ¦ Pub date: April 2019 ¦ Extent: 420 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of barley Edited by Dr Glen Fox and Prof. Chengdao Li 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and genetics 
1.Advances in understanding of barley plant physiology: plant development and architecture: Andrea Visioni, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
2.Advances in understanding of barley plant physiology: response to abiotic stress: Luigi Cattivelli, CRA-IECR, Italy 
3.Advances in understanding of barley plant physiology: factors determining grain development and composition/chemistry: Ljudmilla Borisjuk, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
4.Ensuring/exploiting the genetic diversity of barley: Tefera Angessa, Murdoch University, Australia 
5.Mapping and exploiting the barley genome: Nils Stein, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
 
Part 2 Advances in breeding 
6.Improving ways of designing breeding trials for barley: Alison Kelly, University of Queensland, Australia 
7.Advances in molecular breeding techniques for barley: genome-wide association studies (GWAS): Bill Thomas, James Hutton Institute, UK 
8.Advances in molecular breeding techniques for barley: targeted induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING): Silvio Salvi, University of Bologna, Italy 
9.Advances in developing abiotic stress-tolerant barley varieties: Guoping Zhang, Zhejiang University, China 
 
Part 3 Cultivation techniques, pest and disease management 
10.Good planting and cultivation practices in barley cultivation: Aaron Mills, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
11.Advances in post-harvest storage and handling of barley: Paul Schwarz, North Dakota State University, USA 
12.Fungal diseases affecting barley: Robert Brueggeman, North Dakota State University, USA 
13.Integrated disease management of barley: Adrian Newton, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
14.Integrated weed management in barley cultivation: Michael Widderick, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF), Australia 
 
Part 4 Quality 
15.Developing barley crops for improved malt quality: Glen Fox, University of Queensland, Australia 
16.Developing barley crops for improved brewing quality: Ilka Braumann, Carlsberg Research Laboratory, Denmark 
17.Optimising the use of barley as an animal feed: David Poulsen 
18.Nutritional/nutraceutical compounds in barley: Nancy Ames, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786763082 ¦ Pub date: November 2019 ¦ Extent: 360 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sorghum Volume 2: Sorghum utilization around the world Edited by Prof. William Rooney 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Sorghum utilization 
1.Structure and chemistry of sorghum grain: S. R. Bean, B. P. Ioerger , J. D. Wilson , M. Tilley , D. Rhodes and T. J. Herald , USDA-ARS, USA 
2.The domestication, spread and uses of sorghum as a crop: F. M. Shapter, A. Crowther, G. Fox, I. D. Godwin and L. Watson-Fox, University of Queensland, Australia; I. J. C. Hannah, AGR Industries, Australia; and S. L. Norton, Agriculture Victoria, Australia 
3.Growth, development and physiology of grain sorghum: M. Djanaguiraman, P. V. V. Prasad and I. A. Ciampitti, Kansas State University, USA 
4.Sorghum as a food grain: Barbara J. Stoecker, Oklahoma State University, USA; Kebede Abegaz, Hawassa University, Ethiopia; and Yewelsew Abebe, Alive and Thrive, Ethiopia 
5.Sorghum as a forage and energy crop: Scott Staggenborg and Hui Shen, Chromatin Inc., USA 
 
Part 2 Sorghum production and improvement across the world 
6.Introducing new technologies and market strategies for sorghum producers in developing countries: the Sahel case: John H. Sanders, Purdue University, USA; Botorou Ouendeba, former Director of the 3N Program, Niger; Ababacar Ndoye, former Director of the Institute of Food Technology, Senegal; and Niaba Témé, Institute of the Agricultural Economy (IER), Mali 
7.Improving sorghum cultivation in South America: Rafael Augusto da Costa Parrella, Robert Eugene Schaffert, Cicero Bezerra de Menezes, José Avelino Santos Rodrigues, Jurandir Vieira Magalhães, Cynthia Maria Borges Damasceno, Dagma Dionísia da Silva and Simone Martins Mendes, Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, Brazil 
8.Improving production and utilization of sorghum in Asia: Aruna C., B. Dayakar Rao, Vilas A. Tonapi and T. G. Nageshwar Rao, Indian Institute of Millets Research, India 
9.Sorghum cultivation and improvement in West and Central Africa: E. Weltzien and H. F. W. Rattunde, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, formerly International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Mali; T. A. van Mourik, International Potato Center, Ghana; and H. A. Ajeigbe, International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Nigeria 
ISBN: 9781786761248 ¦ Pub date: April 2018 ¦ Extent: 260 pages ¦ Price £130/$170/€160 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sorghum Volume 1: Genetics, breeding and production techniques Edited by Prof. William Rooney 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Sorghum the crop species 
1.Classifying the genetic diversity of sorghum: a revised classification of sorghum: J. A. Dahlberg, Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center – University of California, USA; and D. T. Rosenow, formerly Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA 
2.The comparative and evolutionary genomics of sorghum: Elizabeth A. Cooper and Stephen Kresovich, Clemson University, USA 
3.Ensuring the genetic diversity of sorghum: Hari D. Upadhyaya and Mani Vetriventhan, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
 
Part 2 Sorghum improvement techniques 
4.The principles and processes of sorghum breeding: Cleve D. Franks, DuPont Pioneer, USA 
5.Advanced technologies to accelerate sorghum breeding: Joseph E. Knoll, USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Harnessing genetic and genomic resources to transform the production and productivity of sorghum: Tesfaye T. Tesso, Dereje D. Gobena, Dechassa O. Duressa, Kraig Roozeboom and Krishna Jagadish, Kansas State University, USA; Ramasamy Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University, USA; and Desalegn D. Serba and Dilooshi Weerasooriya, Kansas State University, USA 
7.Sorghum breeding for biotic stress tolerance: Ramasamy Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University, USA; Clint W. Magill, Texas A&M University, USA; Gary C. Peterson, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA; Louis K. Prom, USDA-ARS, USA; and Elfadil M. Bashir, Tesfaye T. Tesso, Desalegn D. Serba and Christopher R. Little, Kansas State University, USA 
8.Sorghum breeding for abiotic stress tolerance: John J. Burke, USDA-ARS, USA 
9.Sorghum tolerance to low phosphorus soil conditions: Willmar L. Leiser, University of Hohenheim, Germany; H. Frederick Weltzien-Rattunde and Eva Weltzien-Rattunde, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA; and Bettina I.G. Haussmann, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
10.Advanced testing, multiplication and release of new sorghum varieties: Roger L. Monk, formerly DuPont Pioneer, USA 
 
Part 3 Sorghum production techniques 
11.Crop management practices for grain sorghum: an overview: M. Djanaguiraman, P. V. V. Prasad and I. A. Ciampitti, Kansas State University, USA 
12.Improving soil and crop nutrition management in sorghum cultivation: David Mengel, Kansas State University, USA 
13.Improving water management in sorghum cultivation: Jourdan Bell, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA; Robert C. Schwartz, USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, USA; Kevin McInnes, Texas A&M University, USA; Qingwu Xue and Dana Porter, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA 
14.Insect pests and their management in sorghum cultivation: Bonnie B. Pendleton, West Texas A&M University, USA 
15.Sorghum diseases and their management in cultivation: seedling, seed, panicle and foliar diseases: C. R. Little and A. Y. Bandara, Kansas State University, USA and R. Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University, USA 
16.Sorghum diseases and their management in cultivation: stalk, root and other diseases: C. R. Little, A. Y. Bandara and T. C. Todd, Kansas State University, USA; and R. Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University USA 
17.Weed management in sorghum cultivation: M. Bagavathiannan, Texas A&M University, USA; W. Everman, North Carolina State University, USA; P. Govindasamy, Texas A&M University, USA; A. Dille and M. Jugulam, Kansas State University, USA; and J. Norsworthy, University of Arkansas, USA 
18.Post-harvest management of sorghum: B. Tran and R. Hodges, Natural Resources Institute – University of Greenwich, UK 
ISBN: 9781786761200 ¦ Pub date: July 2018 ¦ Extent: 546 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€220 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize Volume 2: Cultivation techniques, pest and disease control Edited by Dr Dave Watson 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Maize cultivation techniques 
1.Modelling crop growth and grain yield in maize cultivation: Alam Sher, Xiaoli Liu and Jincai Li, Anhui Agricultural University, China; and Youhong Song, Anhui Agricultural University, China and The University of Queensland, Australia 
2.Optimizing maize-based cropping systems: sustainability, good agricultural practices (GAP) and yield goals: Charles Wortmann, Patricio Grassini and Roger W. Elmore, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, USA 
3.Maize seed variety selection and seed system development: the case of southern Africa: Peter S. Setimela, Global Maize Program, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), Zimbabwe 
4.Good agricultural practices for maize cultivation: the case of West Africa: Alpha Kamara, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
5.Zero-tillage cultivation of maize: Wade E. Thomason, Bee Khim Chim and Mark S. Reiter, Virginia Tech University, USA 
6.Conservation agriculture for sustainable intensification of maize and other cereal systems: the case of Latin America: Bram Govaerts, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico; Isabelle François, Consultant, USA; and Nele Verhulst, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
7.Precision maize cultivation techniques: Louis Longchamps, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; and Raj Khosla, Colorado State University, USA 
8.Improving nutrient management for sustainable intensification of maize: Kaushik Majumdar, International Plant Nutrition Institute - South Asia, India; Shamie Zingore, International Plant Nutrition Institute - sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya; Fernando Garcia and Adrian Correndo, International Plant Nutrition Institute - Latin America - Southern Cone, Argentina; Jagadish Timsina, University of Melbourne, Australia; Adrian M. Johnston, International Plant Nutrition Institute, Canada 
9.Crop rotation: a sustainable system for maize production: Bao-Luo Ma, Ottawa Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; and Zhigang Wang, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, China 
10.Intercropping in sustainable maize cultivation: Abeya Temesgen, Shu Fukai and Daniel Rodriguez, The University of Queensland, Australia 
11.Climate risk management in maize cropping systems: Daniel Rodriguez, Caspar Roxburgh, Claire Farnsworth, Ariel Ferrante, Joseph Eyre, Stuart Irvine-Brown, James McLean, Martin Bielich, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), The University of Queensland, Australia 
12.Advances in maize post-harvest management: Tadele Tefera, International Center of Insect Physiology & Ecology (ICIPE), Ethiopia 
 
Part 2 Maize pests, diseases and weeds 
13.Economically important insect pests of maize: William D. Hutchison and Theresa M. Cira, University of Minnesota, USA 
14.Nematodes associated with maize: T. L. Niblack, The Ohio State University, USA 
15.Control of rodent pests in maize cultivation: the case of Africa: Loth S. Mulungu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania 
16.Rapid response to disease outbreaks in maize cultivation: the case of maize lethal necrosis: George Mahuku, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania and P. Lava Kumar, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
17.Controlling aflatoxins in maize in Africa: strategies, challenges and opportunities for improvement: Amare Ayalew and Martin Kimanya, Partnership for Aflatoxin Control in Africa, Ethiopia; Limbikani Matumba, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Malawi; Ranajit Bandyopadhayay and Abebe Menkir, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Nigeria; Peter Cotty, USDA-ARS, USA 
18.Integrated weed management in maize cultivation: an overview: Khawar Jabran, Duzce University, Turkey, Mubshar Hussain, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Pakistan and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan, The University of Queensland, Australia 
19.Weed management of maize grown under temperate conditions: the case of Europe and the United States: Vasileios P. Vasileiadis and Maurizio Sattin, National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Agro-Environmental and Forest Biology, Italy and Per Kudsk, Aarhus University, Denmark 
ISBN: 9781786760128 ¦ Pub date: July 2017 ¦ Extent: 470 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize Volume 1: From improved varieties to local applications Edited by Dr Dave Watson 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Genetic diversity and breeding 
1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of maize and its wild relatives: J. Stephen Smith, Iowa State University, USA; Candice A. C. Gardner, USDA-ARS/Iowa State University, USA; and Denise E. Costich, CIMMYT Germplasm Bank (Maize Collection), Mexico 
2.Key challenges in maize breeding in sub-Saharan Africa: Baffour Badu-Apraku, IITA, Nigeria; M.A.B. Fakorede and R.O. Akinwale, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria 
3.Developing maize-breeding methods and cultivars to meet the challenge of climate change: Marcelo J. Carena, North Dakota State University, USA 
4.Understanding and improving protein traits in maize: Yongrui Wu, National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Institute of Plant Physiology & Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; and Joachim Messing, Waksman Institute of Microbiology, Rutgers University, USA 
5.Advances in mycotoxin-resistant maize varieties: Marilyn L. Warburton and W. Paul Williams, USDA-ARS Corn Host Plant Research Resistance Unit, USA 
6.Advances in cold-tolerant maize varieties: Csaba L. Marton and Zsuzsanna Tóthné Zsubori, MTA Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungary 
 
Part 2 Understanding and improving maize nutritional and sensory quality 
7.Nutritional and nutraceutical/functional properties of maize: Dharam Paul Chaudhary, Indian Institute of Maize Research (IIMR), India 
8.Biofortification of maize: Eliab Simpungwe, HarvestPlus, Zambia 
9.Assessing and improving the nutritional quality of maize: Elena Lima-Cabello and Paula Robles-Bolivar, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain and Jose C. Jimenez-Lopez, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain and The University of Western Australia, Australia 
10.Analysing maize grain quality: Glen P. Fox and Tim J. O’Hare, The University of Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 3 Translating research into practice: improving maize cultivation in the developing world 
11.Constraints in adopting improved technologies for maize cultivation: the case of Africa: T. Abdoulaye, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; A. S. Bamire and A. A. Akinola, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria; and A. Alene, A. Menkir and V. Manyong, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
12.Supporting small holders in maize cultivation: using an agricultural innovation systems approach: Mariana Wongtschowski and Remco Mur, Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), The Netherlands; and Carolina Camacho, the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
13.Women and maize cultivation: increasing productivity through gender analysis: Cheryl Doss, Oxford University, UK 
ISBN: 9781786760081 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 348 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of wheat Volume 2: Cultivation techniques Edited by Prof. Peter Langridge 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Wheat cultivation techniques 
1.Variety selection in wheat cultivation: Arun Kumar Joshi, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT); Vinod Kumar Mishra, Banaras Hindu University, India; and Simanchal Sahu, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology, India 
2.Establishment and root development in wheat crops: Peter J. Gregory and Christina K. Clarke, University of Reading, UK 
3.Conservation tillage for sustainable wheat intensification: the example of South Asia: Vijesh Krishna, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Germany; Alwin Keil, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), India; Sreejith Aravindakshan, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Mukesh Meena, Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, India 
4.Improving water management in winter wheat: Q. Xue, J. Rudd, J. Bell, T. Marek and S. Liu, Texas A&M Agrilife Research and Extension Center at Amarillo, USA 
5.Post-harvest wheat losses in Africa: an Ethiopian case study: Tadesse Dessalegn, Tesfaye Solomon, Tesfaye Gebre Kristos, Abiy Solomon, Shure Seboka and Yazie Chane, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Ethiopia; Bhadriraju Subramanyam and Kamala A. Roberts, Kansas State University, USA; Fetien Abay and Rizana Mahroof, South Carolina State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Wheat crop management 
6.Wheat crop modelling to improve yields: J. R. Guarin and S. Asseng, University of Florida, USA 
7.Integrated crop management of wheat: Brian L. Beres, Reem Aboukhaddour and Haley Catton, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Canada 
8.Organic production of wheat and spelt: T. F. Döring, Humbolt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany 
9.Durum wheat: production, challenges and opportunities: J. M. Clarke, K. Nilsen, D. Khitiri, X. Lin and C. J. Pozniak, University of Saskatchewan, Canada; and K. Ammar, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
 
Part 3 Improving wheat cultivation in the developing world 
10.Supporting smallholders in improving wheat cultivation: Tinashe Chiurugwi, Simon Kerr, Ian Midgley, and Lesley Boyd, National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB), UK; Johnson Kamwaga, Food Crops Research Centre - Njoro, Kenya; Peter Njau, Highlands Agri-consult Services Ltd, Kenya; Terry Van Gevelt, University of Cambridge, UK; Claudia Canales and Max Marcheselli, the Malaysian Commonwealth Studies Centre (MCSC) and the Cambridge Malaysian Education and Development Trust (CMEDT), UK 
11.Improving wheat cultivation in Asia: Rajiv Kumar Sharma, Global Wheat Improvement Program - CIMMYT, India 
12.Improving wheat production in the Central and West Asia and North Africa (CWANA) region: W. Tadesse, A. Amri, M. Sanchez-Garcia, M. El-Bouhssini, M. Karrou, S. Patil, F. Bassi and M. Baum, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Morocco; and T. Oweis, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Jordan 
ISBN: 9781786760203 ¦ Pub date: July 2017 ¦ Extent: 350 pages ¦ Price £130/$170/€155 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of wheat Volume 1: Breeding, quality traits, pests and diseases Edited by Prof. Peter Langridge 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Wheat physiology and breeding 
1.Wheat genetic resources: global conservation and use for the future: P. Bramel, Global Crop Diversity Trust, Germany 
2.Sequencing and assembly of the wheat genome: Kellye Eversole and Jane Rogers, International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, USA; Beat Keller, University of Zurich, Switzerland; Rudi Appels, Murdoch University, Australia; Catherine Feuillet, Bayer Crop Science, USA 
3.Advances in wheat breeding techniques: Alison R. Bentley and Ian Mackay, NIAB, UK 
4.Improving the uptake and assimilation of nitrogen in wheat plants: Jacques Le Gouis, INRA, France and Malcolm Hawkesford, Rothamsted Research, UK 
5.Photosynthetic improvement of wheat plants: Martin A. J. Parry, João Paulo Pennacchi, Luis Robledo-Arratia and Elizabete Carmo-Silva, Lancaster University, UK; and Luis Robledo-Arratia, University of Cambridge, UK 
6.Improving drought and heat tolerance in wheat: Xinguo Mao, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; Delong Yang, College of Life Science and Technology, Gansu Agricultural University, China; and Ruilian Jing, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
7.Advances in cold-resistant wheat varieties: D.Z. Skinner, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 2 Wheat nutritional and processing quality 
8.Genetic and other factors affecting wheat quality: A. S. Ross, Oregon State University, USA 
9.Measuring wheat quality: Ian Batey, formerly CSIRO, Australia 
10.The nutritional and nutraceutical value of wheat: Victoria Ndolo and Trust Beta, University of Manitoba, Canada 
 
Part 3 Wheat diseases, pests and weeds 
11.Wheat diseases: an overview: Albrecht Serfling, Doris Kopahnke, Antje Habekuss, Flutur ë Novakazi and Frank Ordon, Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany 
12.Advances in control of wheat rusts: Z. A. Pretorius, University of the Free State, South Africa; M. Ayliffe, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia; R. L. Bowden, ARS-USDA, USA; L. A. Boyd, National Institute of Agricultural Botany, UK; R. M. DePauw, Advancing Wheat Technologies, Canada; Y. Jin, ARS-USDA Cereal Disease Laboratory, USA; R. E. Knox, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; R. A. McIntosh and R. F. Park, University of Sydney, Australia; R. Prins, CenGen and University of the Free State, South Africa; E. S. Lagudah, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia 
13.Advances in control of wheat diseases: Fusarium head blight, wheat blast and powdery mildew: Hermann Buerstmayr, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria; Volker Mohler, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture, Germany; and Mohan Kohli, Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology, Paraguay 
14.Advances in disease-resistant wheat varieties: James Anderson, University of Minnesota, USA 
15.Recent molecular technologies for tackling wheat diseases: Indu Sharma, Pramod Prasad and Subhash C. Bhardwaj, ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, India 
16.Integrated wheat disease management: Stephen N. Wegulo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
17.Wheat pests: introduction, rodents and nematodes: Marion O. Harris North Dakota State University, USA; Jens Jacob, Julius Kühn-Institut; Peter Brown, CSIRO, Australia; and Guiping Yan, North Dakota State University, USA 
18.Wheat pests: insects, mites, and prospects for the future: Marion O. Harris and Kirk Anderson, North Dakota State University, USA; Mustapha El-Bouhssini, ICARDA, Morocco; Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, USA; Gary Hein, University of Nebraska, USA; and Steven Xu, USDA-ARS Northern Crops Institute, USA 
19.The impact of climate change on wheat insect pests: current knowledge and future trends: Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, USA and Sarina Macfadyen, CSIRO, Australia 
20.Integrated pest management in wheat cultivation: Abie Horrocks and Melanie Davidson, The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, New Zealand; and Paul Horne and Jessica Page, IPM Technologies Pty Limited, Australia 
21.Integrated weed management in wheat cultivation: K. Neil Harker and John O’Donovan, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada; and Breanne Tidemann, University of Alberta, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786760166 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 686 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Fruit, vegetables and nuts 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of tree nuts Edited by Prof. Ümit Serdar and Emeritus Prof. Dennis Fulbright 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Improving health, safety and sustainability 
1.Advances in understanding health benefits of walnuts: Turan Karadeniz, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Turkey 
2.Advances in understanding health benefits of almonds: Özlem Tokuşoğlu, Celal Bayar University, Turkey 
3.Advances in understanding health benefits of hazelnuts: Loretta Baccetta, ENEA Casaccia Research Center, Italy 
4.Advances in understanding health benefits of chestnuts: Eduardo A S Rosa, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes, Portugal 
5.Advances in understanding health benefits of pistachio: Pablo Hernández-Alonso, Universitat Rovira I Virgili, Spain 
6.Advances in detecting/Identifying nut allergens: Stef Koppelman, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
7.Integrated disease management in tree nut cultivation: Andrea Vannini, University of Tuscia, Italy 
8.Tree nut cultivation, biodiversity and conservation: Gabriele Beccaro, University of Turin, Italy 
 
Part 2 Improving individual types of tree nuts 
9.Towards sustainable production of walnut (Juglans regia L.): Annarita Marrano and David Neale, University of California-Davis, USA 
10.Advances in cultivation of walnuts: David McNeil, University of Tasmania, Australia 
11.Advances in cultivation of almonds: Ettore Barone, University of Palermo, Italy 
12.Advances in breeding of chestnuts: Cécile Robin, INRA, France 
13.Advances in cultivation of chestnuts: Ümit Serdar, Ondokuz Mayis University, Turkey 
14.Advances in breeding of pistachio: Salih Kafkas, University of Çukurova, Turkey 
15.Advances in cultivation of pistachio: Bekir Erol AK, Harran University, Turkey 
16.Developing hazelnuts as a crop: Valerio Cristofori, University of Tuscia, Italy 
17.Advances in breeding of hazelnuts: Ali Islam, University of Ordu, Turkey 
ISBN: 9781786762245 ¦ Pub date: April 2019 ¦ Extent: 340 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of temperate zone tree fruits and berries Volume 2 Edited by Prof. Gregory A. Lang 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Stone and pome fruits 
1.Advances and challenges in peach breeding: Dario J. Chavez and Rachel A. Itle, University of Georgia, USA; Daniel Mancero-Castillo and Jose X. Chaparro, University of Florida, USA; and Thomas G. Beckman, USDA-ARS, USA 
2.Advances and challenges in sustainable peach production: Luca Corelli-Grappadelli, Brunella Morandi and Luigi Manfrini, University of Bologna, Italy; and Pasquale Losciale, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics - Research Centre for Agriculture and Environment, Italy 
3.Advances and challenges in cherry breeding: Jose Quero-Garcia, INRA, France; Amy Iezzoni, Michigan State University, USA; Gregario Lopez-Ortega, Instituto Murciano de Investigacion y Desarrollo Agrario y Alimentario, Spain; Cameron Peace, Washington State University, USA; Mathieu Fouché and Elisabeth Dirlewanger, INRA, France; and Mirko Schuster, Julius Kühn-Institut, Germany 
4.Advances and challenges in sustainable cherry cultivation: Greg Lang, Michigan State University, USA 
5.Advances and challenges in pear breeding: Amit Dhingra, Washington State University, USA 
6.Advances and challenges in sustainable pear cultivation: Todd Einhorn, Michigan State University, USA 
7.Advances and challenges in apple breeding: Amanda Karlstrom, NIAB-EMR and University of Reading, UK; Magdalena Cobo Medina, NIAB-EMR and University of Nottingham, UK; and Richard J. Harrison, NIAB-EMR, UK 
8.Advances and challenges in sustainable apple cultivation: Pierre-Éric Lauri and Sylvaine Simon, INRA, France 
9.Advances and challenges in sustainable plum and apricot cultivation: Mihai Botu, University of Craiova, Romania 
 
Part 2 Berry fruits 
10.Advances and challenges in strawberry breeding: Chris R. Barbey and Kevin Folta, University of Florida-Gainsville, USA 
11.Strawberries: a case study of how evolving market expectations impact sustainability: M. P. Pritts, Cornell University, USA; and T. M. Sjulin, formerly Driscoll Strawberry Associates, USA 
12.Advances and challenges in raspberry and blackberry breeding: Ramón Molina-Bravo, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Costa Rica; Margaret Leigh Worthington, University of Arkansas, USA and Gina E. Fernandez, North Carolina State University, USA 
13.Advances and challenges in sustainable raspberry/blackberry cultivation: Julie Graham, Alison Karley, Alison Dolan, Dominic Williams and Nikki Jennings, James Hutton Institute, UK 
14.Advances and challenges in blueberry breeding: Susan McCallum, James Hutton Institute, UK 
ISBN: 9781786762122 ¦ Pub date: March 2019 ¦ Extent: 320 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of temperate zone tree fruits and berries Volume 1 Edited by Prof. Gregory A. Lang 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Physiology and genetics 
1.Advances in understanding fruit tree root-rhizosphere relationships for enhanced plant health: Mark Mazzola and Shashika S. Hewavitharana, USDA-ARS, USA 
2.Advances in development and utilization of rootstocks for fruit tree cultivation: Gennaro Fazio, USDA-ARS and Cornell University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding fruit tree growth: Ted DeJong, University of California-Davis, USA 
4.Advances in understanding reproductive development in fruit-bearing plants: Tomoya Esumi, Shimane University, Japan; and Ryutaro Tao, Kyoto University, Japan 
5.Advances in fruit genetics: Ksenija Gasic and Christopher Saski, Clemson University, USA 
 
Part 2 Optimizing sustainable cultivation and quality 
6.Optimizing production of quality nursery plants for fruit tree cultivation: Stefano Musacchi, Washington State University, USA; and Davide Neri, Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center, USA 
7.Optimizing orchard design, establishment and plant management: Greg Lang, Michigan State University, USA 
8.Optimizing precision in orchard irrigation and nutrient management: Denise Neilsen and Gerry Neilsen, Pacific Agriculture and AgriFood Canada, Canada 
9.Optimizing plant growth, yield and fruit quality with plant bioregulators: Duane Greene, University of Massachusetts, USA 
10.Optimizing fruit production efficiencies via mechanization: Manoj Karkee, Jacqueline Gordón, Bernardita Sallto and Matthew Whiting, Washington State University, USA 
11.Optimizing pest management in fruit cultivation; Arthur Agnello, Cornell University, USA 
12.Optimizing disease management in fruit cultivation: Sara M. Villani, North Carolina State University, USA; Kerik D. Cox, Cornell University, USA; and George Sundin, Michigan State University, USA 
13.Pre- and post-harvest strategies to optimize fruit quality and shelf-life: Peter M. A. Toivonen, Pacific Agriculture and AgriFood Canada, Canada 
14.Bioactive/nutraceutical compounds in fruit that optimize human health benefits: Federica Blando and Miriana Durante, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA), Italy; and B. Dave Oomah, formerly Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786762085 ¦ Pub date: March 2019 ¦ Extent: 300 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of vegetables Edited by Emeritus Prof. George Hochmuth 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Physiology and breeding 
1. Advances in understanding vegetable physiology: Felipe Barrios-Masias, University of Nevada, USA 
2. Advances in understanding vegetable responses to abiotic stress: Dietmar Schwarz, Liebniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Germany 
3. Advances in understanding and enhancing the nutritional quality of vegetables: Dean Kopsell, University of Tennessee, USA 
4. Developments in breeding of vegetables: John Juvik, University of Illinois, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultivation 
5. Advances in irrigation techniques in vegetable cultivation: Jeffrey Mitchell, University of California-Davis, USA 
6. Advances in nutrition/fertiliser use in vegetable cultivation: Charles Sanchez, University of Arizona, USA 
7. Advances in understanding soil health for vegetable cultivation: Ajay Nair, Iowa State University, USA 
8. Advances in greenhouse and other protected structures cultivation of vegetables: Martine Dorais, Laval University, Canada 
9. Developments in soilless/hydroponic cultivation of vegetables: Dimitrios Savvas, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece 
10. Advances in organic cultivation of vegetables: Xin Zhao, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 3 Pests and pathogens 
11. Advances in understanding and monitoring diseases of vegetables: Mohammad Babadoost, University of Illinois, USA 
12. Advances in understanding insect pests of vegetables: Ken Sorensen, North Carolina State University, USA 
13. Integrated pest management of vegetables: Joshua Freeman, University of Florida, USA 
14. Advances in understanding pathogenic contamination of vegetables: Max Teplitski, NIFA-USDA, USA 
 
Part 4 Case studies 
15. Advances in carrot breeding: Emmanuel Geoffriau, INRA, France 
16. Advances in carrot cultivation: Mary Ruth McDonald, University of Guelph, Canada 
17. Advances in lettuce breeding: German Sandoya, University of Florida, USA 
18. Advances in lettuce cultivation: Rosemary Collier, University of Warwick, UK 
19. Sustainable production of cabbage on plasticulture: Charles E. Barrett, Lucas G. Paranhos, Kati W. Migliaccio, Gary K. England and Lincoln Zotarelli, University of Florida, USA 
20. Advances in breeding of cucumbers/other cucurbit: Todd Wehner, North Carolina State University, USA 
21. Advances in cultivation of cucumbers/cucurbits: Alan Walters, Southern Illinois University, USA 
22. Advances in breeding of peas: Diego Rubiales, IAS-CSIC, Spain 
ISBN: 9781786762368 ¦ Pub date: April 2019 ¦ Extent: 420 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of tropical fruits Edited by Prof. Elhadi M. Yahia  

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Citrus fruits 
1.Advances in the development and use of genetic resources for citrus: Francois Luro, INRA, France 
2.Mapping and exploiting the citrus genome: Patrick Ollitrault, CIRAD, France 
3.Advances in nutrient management in citrus cultivation: Davie Kadyampakeni, Citrus Research Center - University of Florida, USA 
4.Precision agriculture and automation in citrus cultivation: Marcos Ferreira, EMBRAPA, Brazil 
5.Advances in understanding and managing viral diseases affecting citrus: Med Bouhida, Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II, Morocco 
6.Advances in understanding the ecology of citrus insect pests: Robert Jones, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Mexico 
7.Advances in integrated pest management (IPM) in citrus cultivation: Lukasz Stelinski, Citrus Research Center - University of Florida, USA 
8.Advances in post-harvest handling citrus fruit: John Golding, DPI-NSW, Australia 
9.Advances in breeding and/or cultivation of limes: Mumtaz Khan, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman 
10.Advances in breeding and/or cultivation of mandarins: Luis Navarro, IVIA, Spain 
 
Part 2 Other tropical fruits: soft fruits 
11.Advances in cultivation of bananas and plantains: Charles Staver, Bioversity International, France 
12.Advances in breeding/cultivation of kiwifruit: Mustafa Akbulut, Tayyip Erdogan University, Turkey 
13.Advances in breeding cultivation of lychee: Xuming Huang, South China Agricultural University, China 
14.Advances in breeding of papaya: Sunil Kumar Sharma, ICAR, India 
15.Advances in cultivation of papaya: Parmeshwar Lal Saran, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India 
16.Advances in breeding of pineapple: Jose Leitao, University of Algarve, Portugal 
17.Advances in cultivation of pineapple: Samual Ndungu, SSNC, Sweden 
18.Advances in breeding/cultivation of pomegranate: Ibrahim Kahramanoglu, European University of Lefke, Cyprus 
 
Part 3 Other tropical fruits: stone and other fruits 
19.Advances in avocado propagation for the sustainable supply of planting materials: Alice Hayward, University of Queensland, Australia 
20.Advances in cultivation of avocado: Gary Bender, University of California-Riverside, USA 
21.Advances in breeding of coconut: Lalith Parera, Coconut Research Institute, Sri Lanka 
22.Advances in cultivation of coconut: Mike Foale, University of Queensland, Australia 
23.Advances in breeding of guava: Kalidindi Usha, IARI, India 
24.Advances in cultivation of guava: Asgar Warsi, University of Nottingham, Malaysia 
25.Advances in breeding of jackfruit: Shyamala Reddy, University of Agricultural Science, India 
26.Advances in cultivation of jackfruit: Noor Baiti Aziz, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), Malaysia 
27.Advances in breeding of mangoes: Sunday Akinyemi, NIHORT, Nigeria 
28.Advances in cultivation of mangoes: Victor Galán Saúco, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias (ICIA), Spain 
29.Advances in breeding/cultivation of olives: Bekir Erol AK, Harran University, Turkey 
ISBN: 9781786762849 ¦ Pub date: August 2019 ¦ Extent: 520 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of bananas Volume 1: Cultivation techniques Edited by Dr Gert H. J. Kema and André Drenth 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Banana production and its challenges 
1.The origin, domestication and dispersal of bananas: Hugo Volkaert, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Thailand 
2.Understanding the banana industry: monoculture and beyond: Dan Koeppel, Independent Journalist and Researcher, USA 
3.Banana cultivation in Africa: W. K. Tushemereirwe and J. Kubiriba, National Agricultural Research Laboratories, Uganda 
4.Challenges and opportunities for smallholders in banana value chains: William Tinzaara, Bioversity International, Uganda; Dietmar Stoian, Bioversity International, France, Walter Ocimati, Enoch Kikulwe and Gloria Otieno, Bioversity International, Uganda; and Guy Blomme, Bioversity International, Ethiopia 
 
Part 2 Improving practices across the banana value chain 
5.A functional approach to bunch formation in banana: D. W. Turner, School of Agriculture and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Australia; and D. J. Gibbs, Consultant, Australia 
6.Banana plant propagation methods: Sharon D. Hamill, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
7.Conserving banana germplasm through field genebanks: Mike Smith, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
8.Good agricultural practices: an end or a starting point for more sustainable banana production?: Charles Staver, Bioversity International, France 
9.Challenges in cultivation of bananas in the subtropics: Víctor Galán Saúco, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias, Spain 
10.Nutrition and soil management in banana cultivation: Jetse J. Stoorvogel, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Rafael A. Segura, CORBANA S.A., Costa Rica 
11.Harvesting and packaging of bananas: Juan José Aycart, Dole, Ecuador 
12.Ripening systems for bananas: Frits Popma, Popma Fruit Expertise, The Netherlands 
 
Part 3 Assessing and improving sustainability 
13.Life cycle assessment and carbon footprint of banana cultivation: Louis Bockel, Laure-Sophie Schiettecatte and Orane Debrune, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Italy 
14.Sustainable banana cultivation: from standards to multiple solutions: Sietze Vellema and Kees Jansen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
15.Organic banana cultivation and sustainability: Frans Wielemaker, Consultant (formerly Director of Research at Dole Fresh Fruit International), Costa Rica 
ISBN: 9781786761569 ¦ Pub date: October 2018 ¦ Extent: 378 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of mangoes Edited by Dr Victor Galán Saúco and Dr Ping Lu 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Genetic improvement and plant physiology 
1.Exploiting the mango genome: molecular markers: V. Pérez and J. I. Hormaza , Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea La Mayora (IHSM La Mayora – CSIC – UMA), Spain 
2.The genetic diversity of mangoes: Noris Ledesma, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, USA 
3.Advances in understanding mango tree growth and canopy development: Frédéric Normand, CIRAD, France; and Pierre-Éric Lauri, INRA, France 
4.Advances in understanding flowering, pollination and fruit development in mangoes: Maria Hilda Pérez-Barraza and Jorge Alberto Osuna-Garcia, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agrícolas y Pecuarias, Mexico 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
5.Mango cultivation practices in the tropics: good agricultural practices to maximise sustainable yields: Sisir Mitra, International Society for Horticultural Science, India and A. Bhagwan, Fruit Research Station, India 
6.Mango cultivation practices for the subtropics: Victor Galán Saúco, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias, Spain 
7.Mango cultivation in greenhouses: John Y. Yonemoto, Japan Tropical Fruit Association, Japan 
8.Management of an ultra-high-density mango orchard and benefits of the small-tree system: Steven A. Oosthuyse, HortResearch SA, South Africa 
9.Organic mango production: a review: Víctor Manuel Medina-Urrutia, Jaime Eduardo Reyes-Hernández, Gil Virgen-Calleros and Enrique Pimienta-Barrios, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico; and Marciano Manuel Robles-González, Campo Experimental Tecomán, Mexico 
10.Improving fertilizer and water-use efficiency in mango cultivation: A. G. Levin, Supplant Ltd, Israel 
 
Part 3 Post-harvest management 
11.Monitoring fruit quality and quantity in mangoes: Kerry Walsh and Zhenglin Wang, Central Queensland University, Australia 
12.Understanding post-harvest deterioration of mangoes: Apiradee Uthairatanakij and Pongphen Jitareerat, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Thailand; Robert E. Paull, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA 
13.Post-harvest storage management of mango fruit: Noam Alkan, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, Israel; and Anirudh Kumar, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, Israel and Indira Gandhi National Tribal University (IGNTU), India 
14.The nutritional and nutraceutical/functional properties of mangoes: Laurent Urban, University of Avignon, France; Mônica Maria de Almeida Lopes and Maria Raquel Alcântara de Miranda, Federal University of Ceará, Brazil 
15.Life cycle assessment of mango systems: Claudine Basset-Mens, Sandra Payen, Henri Vannière, Angela Braun and Yannick Biard, CIRAD, France 
 
Part 4 Diseases and pests 
16.Integrated disease management in mango cultivation: Randy C. Ploetz, University of Florida, USA 
17.Integrated pest management and biological pest control strategies in mango cultivation: Stefano De Faveri, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
ISBN: 9781786761323 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 570 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of apples Edited by Dr K. Evans 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of apples: Gayle M. Volk, USDA-ARS-CARR National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, USA 
2.The apple genome - harbinger of innovation for sustainable apple production: Amit Dhingra, Washington State University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding apple tree growth: rootstocks and planting systems: Dugald C. Close and Sally A. Bound, University of Tasmania, Australia 
4.Advances in understanding apple tree growth: the manipulation of tree growth and development: Dugald C. Close and Sally A. Bound, University of Tasmania, Australia 
5.Advances in understanding flowering and pollination in apple trees: Peter M. Hirst, Purdue University, USA 
6.Advances in understanding apple fruit development: A.N. Lakso and M. C. Goffinet, Cornell University, USA 
7.Evaluating and improving rootstocks for apple cultivation: G. Fazio, USDA-ARS/Cornell University, USA 
8.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of apples: K. Evans and C. Peace, Washington State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
9.Innovations in apple tree cultivation to manage crop load and ripening: Stefano Musacchi, Washington State University, USA; and Duane Greene, University of Massachusetts, USA 
10.Advances in soil and nutrient management in apple cultivation: G. H. Neilsen, D. Neilsen and T. Forge, Summerland Research and Development Centre Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; and K. Hannam, Natural Resources Canada 
11.Mechanization and automation for apple production: Q. Zhang, M. Karkee and L. R. Khot, Washington State University, USA 
12.Sustainable approaches to control postharvest diseases of apples: W. J. Janisiewicz and W. M. Jurick II, USDA-ARS, USA 
13.Advances in postharvest handling and storage of apples: Christopher B. Watkins, Cornell University, USA 
 
Part 3 Diseases and pests 
14.Pre- and postharvest fungal apple diseases: Wayne M. Jurick II, USDA-ARS, USA and Kerik D. Cox, Cornell University, USA 
15.Management of viruses and virus-like agents affecting apple production: Kenneth C. Eastwell, Washington State University, USA 
16.Bacterial diseases affecting apples: John Norelli, USDA-ARS, USA 
17.Sustainable arthropod management for apples: Elizabeth H. Beers, Washington State University, USA 
18.Advances in pest- and disease-resistant apple varieties: Markus Kellerhals, Agroscope, Switzerland 
 
Part 4 Sustainability 
19.The economics of apple production: R. Karina Gallardo, Washington State University, USA; and Hildegard Garming, Thünen Institute of Farm Economics, Germany 
20.Consumer trends in apple sales: Desmond O’Rourke, Washington State University and Belrose Inc., USA 
21.Assessing the environmental impact and sustainability of apple cultivation: D. Granatstein, Washington State University, USA; and G. Peck, Cornell University, USA 
22.Growing organic apples in Europe: Jutta Kienzle, Independent Researcher, Germany; and Markus Kelderer, Research Station of Laimburg, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786760326 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 616 pages ¦ Price £220/$285/€265 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of tomatoes Edited by Dr A. K. Mattoo and Prof. A. K. Handa 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cultivation techniques 
1.Modelling crop growth and yield in tomato cultivation: Kenneth J. Boote, University of Florida, USA 
2.Optimizing yields in tomato cultivation: maximizing tomato plant use of resources: V. S. Almeida, F. T. Delazari, C. Nick, W. L. Araújo and D. J. H. Silva, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil 
3.Improving water and nutrient management in tomato cultivation: E. Simonne, M. Ozores-Hampton, A. Simonne and A. Gazula, University of Florida, USA 
4.Organic greenhouse tomato production: Martine Dorais, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Laval University, Quebec, Canada 
 
Part 2 Plant physiology and breeding 
5.Understanding and improving water-use efficiency and drought resistance in tomato: A. Zsögön, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil; and M. H. Vicente, D. S. Reartes and L. E. P. Peres, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil 
6.Ensuring the genetic diversity of tomatoes: Andreas W. Ebert and Lawrence Kenyon, AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center, Taiwan 
7.Tomato plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress: C. A. Avila, S. C. Irigoyen and K. K. Mandadi, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, USA 
8.Developments in tomato breeding: conventional and biotechnology tools: Y. Bai, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
9.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of tomatoes: Junming Li, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers – Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), China 
10.Genetic engineering of tomato to improve nutritional quality, resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses, and for non-food applications: B. Kaur and A. K. Handa, Purdue University, USA; and A. K. Mattoo, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Developing tomato varieties with improved flavour: M. Causse, E. Albert and C. Sauvage, INRA, France 
12.Understanding and improving the shelf life of tomatoes: K. Wang and A. K. Handa, Purdue University, USA; and A. K. Mattoo, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 3 Diseases, pests and weeds 
13.Insect-transmitted viral diseases infecting tomato crops: H. Czosnek, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; A. Koren, Hishtil Nursery, Israel; and F. Vidavski, Tomatech R&D, Israel 
14.Genetic resistance to viruses in tomato: Moshe Lapidot and Ilan Levin, Institute of Plant Sciences – Volcani Center, ARO, Israel 
15.Bio-ecology of major insect and mite pests of tomato crops in the tropics: R. Srinivasan, AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center, Taiwan 
16.Integrated pest management in tomato cultivation: Robert L. Gilbertson, Marcela Vasquez-Mayorga and Mônica Macedo, University of California-Davis, USA; and R. Muniappan, Virginia Tech, USA 
17.Developing disease-resistant tomato varieties: D. R. Panthee, J. P. Kressin and P. Adhikari, North Carolina State University, USA 
18.Integrated weed management in tomato cultivation: Francesco Tei and Euro Pannacci, University of Perugia, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786760401 ¦ Pub date: March 2017 ¦ Extent: 564 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Roots, tubers and pulses 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of potatoes Volume 2: Production, storage and crop protection Edited by Dr Stuart Wale 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Potato production and storage 
1.Modelling potato growth: Ilkka Leinonen, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), UK; and Hongyan Chen and James A. Taylor, Newcastle University, UK 
2.Improving potato cultivation practices: an overview: Vijay Kumar Dua, Sanjay Rawal, Sukhwinder Singh and Jagdev Sharma, ICAR-Central Potato Research Institute, India 
3.Improving nutrient management in potato cultivation: Philip J. White, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
4.Advances in irrigation management and technology in potato cultivation: experiences from a humid climate: Jerry Knox and Tim Hess, Cranfield University, UK 
5.Organic potato cultivation: Thomas F. Döring, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and University of Bonn, Germany; and Derek H. Lynch, Dalhousie University, Canada 
6.Post-harvest storage of potatoes: Adrian Briddon, Adrian Cunnington and Glyn Harper, Sutton Bridge Crop Storage Research, UK 
7.Acrylamide formation in fried potato products and its mitigation: Bruno De Meulenaer, Raquel Medeiros Vinci and Frédéric Mestdagh, Ghent University, Belgium 
 
Part 2 Diseases and pests 
8.Fungal diseases affecting potato storage: A. Lees, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
9.Bacterial diseases affecting potatoes: M. Jennifer Sjölund, Rachel Kelly, Gerry S. Saddler and David M. Kenyon, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), UK 
10.Viruses affecting potatoes: Colin Jeffries and Christophe Lacomme, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), UK 
11.Non-infectious disorders affecting potatoes: Andrew P. Robinson, North Dakota State University and University of Minnesota, USA 
12.Nematode pests of potatoes: Kim Davie and Jon Pickup, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), UK 
13.Potato pest management with specific reference to the Pacific Northwest (USA): Stuart Reitz, Oregon State University, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761286 ¦ Pub date: September 2018 ¦ Extent: 328 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of potatoes Volume 1: Breeding improved varieties Edited by Dr Gefu Wang-Pruski 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Advances in understanding potato plant physiology and growth: Curtis M. Frederick, University of Wisconsin, USA; Masahiko Mori, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan; and Paul C. Bethke, USDA-ARS and University of Wisconsin, USA 
2.Understanding ageing processes in seed potatoes: Paul C. Struik, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
3.Ensuring the genetic diversity of potatoes: John Bamberg and Shelley Jansky, USDA-ARS, USA; Alfonso del Rio, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA; and Dave Ellis, International Potato Center (CIP), Peru 
4.Advances in conventional potato-breeding techniques: Jai Gopal, ICAR-Central Potato Research Institute, India 
5.Hybrid potato breeding for improved varieties: Pim Lindhout, Michiel de Vries, Menno ter Maat, Su Ying, Marcela Viquez-Zamora and Sjaak van Heusden, Solynta, The Netherlands 
 
Part 2 Improving particular traits 
6.Advances in development of potato varieties resistant to abiotic stress: Ankush Prashar and Filipe de Jesus Colwell, Newcastle University, UK; and Csaba Hornyik and Glenn J. Bryan, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
7.Developing early-maturing, stress-resistant potato varieties: Prashant G. Kawar, ICAR-Directorate of Floricultural Research, India; Hemant B. Kardile, Raja S., Som Dutt, Raj Kumar Goyal, Vinay Bhardwaj, B. P. Singh, P. M. Govindakrishnan and S. K. Chakrabarti, ICAR-Central Potato Research Institute, India; and P. Manivel, ICAR-Directorate of Medicinal & Aromatic Plants Research, India 
8.Developing new sweet potato varieties with improved performance: Peng Zhang, Weijuan Fan, Hongxia Wang, Yinliang Wu and Wenzhi Zhou, Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; and Jun Yang, Shanghai Chenshan Plant Science Research Center, Shanghai Chenshan Botanical Garden, China 
9.Nutritional properties and enhancement/bio-fortification of potatoes: Duroy A. Navarre, Washington State University and USDA-ARS, USA; and M. Moehninsi, Sen Lin and Hanjo Hellmann, Washington State University, USA 
10.Improving the breeding, cultivation and use of sweetpotato in Africa: Putri Ernawati Abidin and Edward Ewing Carey, International Potato Center (CIP), Ghana 
 
Part 3 Translating research into practice: improving cultivation in the developing world 
11.Potato production and breeding in China: Liping Jin, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
12.Improving potato cultivation to promote food self-sufficiency in Africa: Moses Nyongesa and Nancy Ng’ang’a, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Kenya 
13.Supporting smallholder women farmers in potato cultivation: Linley Chiwona-Karltun, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Maryanne Wamahiu, Stockholm University, Sweden; Chikondi Chabvuta, Actionaid International, Malawi; Dianah Ngonyama, Association of African Agricultural Professionals in the Diaspora, USA; and Paul Demo, International Potato Center (CIP), Malawi 
ISBN: 9781786761002 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 320 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of grain legumes Volume 2: Improving cultivation of particular grain legumes Edited by Dr Shoba Sivasankar, Dr David Bergvinson, Dr Pooran Gaur, Dr Shiv Kumar Agrawal, Dr Steve Beebe, and Dr Manuele Tamò 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cultivation of common beans, lentils, soybeans and groundnuts 
1.Developing improved varieties of common bean: James D. Kelly, Michigan State University, USA 
2.Improving cultivation practices for common beans: John O. Ojiem, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Kenya 
3.Developing improved varieties of lentil: William Erskine, University of Western Australia, Australia; Ashutosh Sarker, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), India; and Shiv Kumar, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
4.Improving cultivation of lentils: : Fred J. Muehlbauer, Washington State University, USA; and Ashutosh Sarker, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), India 
5.The use of marker-assisted selection in developing improved varieties of soybean: Y.-C. Lee, R. Lemes Hamawaki, V. Colantonio, M. J. Iqbal and D. A. Lightfoot, Southern Illinois University, USA 
6.Improving cultivation practices for soybeans in sub-Saharan Africa: Frederick P. Baijukya and Harun M. Murithi, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania; and Fred Kanampiu, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya 
7.Developing improved varieties of groundnut: C. Michael Deom, University of Georgia, USA; David Kalule Okello, National Semi-Arid Resources Research Institute, Uganda 
8.Improving cultivation of groundnuts: S. N. Nigam, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India; D. L. Jordan, North Carolina State University, USA; and P. Janila, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
9.Preventing mycotoxin contamination in groundnut cultivation: David Jordan, Rick Brandenburg and Gary Payne, North Carolina State University, USA; David Hoisington, Nick Magnan and James Rhoads, The University of Georgia, USA; Mumuni Abudulai, Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Ghana; Koushik Adhikari and Jinru Chen, The University of Georgia, USA; Richard Akromah, William Appaw and William Ellis, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana; Maria Balota and Kumar Mallikarjunan, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA; Kenneth Boote and Greg MacDonald, University of Florida, USA; Kira Bowen, Auburn University, USA; Boris Bravo-Ureta and Jeremy Jelliffe, University of Connecticut, USA; Agnes Budu, University of Ghana, Ghana; Hendrix Chalwe, Alice Mweetwa and Munsanda Ngulube, University of Zambia, Zambia; Awere Dankyi and Brandford Mochia, Crops Research Institute, Ghana; Vivian Hoffmann, International Food Policy Research Institute, USA; Amade Muitia, Mozambique Institute of Agricultural Research, Mozambique; Agnes Mwangwela, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Malawi; Sam Njoroge, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Malawi; David Okello, National Semi-Arid Resources Research Institute (NaSARRI), Uganda; and Nelson Opoku, University for Development Studies, Ghana 
 
Part 2 Cultivation of cowpea, faba beans and pigeonpea 
10.Breeding improved varieties of cowpea: B. B. Singh, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, India 
11.Improving cultivation of cowpea in West Africa: Alpha Y. Kamara, Lucky O. Omoigui and Nkeki Kamai, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Sylvester U. Ewansiha, University of Benin, Nigeria; and Hakeem A. Ajeigbe, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Nigeria 
12.Developing improved varieties of faba bean: Fouad Maalouf, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Lebanon; and Seid Ahmed and Somanagouda Patil, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
13.Efficient and sustainable production of faba bean: R. Redden, RJR Agricultural Consultants, Australia; X. Zong, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), China; R. M. Norton, International Plant Nutrition Institute and University of Melbourne, Australia; F. L. Stoddard, University of Helsinki, Finland; F. Maalouf, International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA), Lebanon; S. Ahmed and M. El Bouhssini, International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco; Y. Tao and L. Rong, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), China; and Li Ling, Liaoning Academy of Agricultural Science, China 
14.Developing improved varieties of pigeonpea: K. B. Saxena, United Arab Emirates; Y. S. Chauhan, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia; C. V. S. Kumar, A. J. Hingane, R. V. Kumar, R. K. Saxena and G. V. R. Rao, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
15.Improving the cultivation of pigeonpea: K. R. Latha and L. Vimalendran, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India 
ISBN: 9781786761408 ¦ Pub date: January 2018 ¦ Extent: 398 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of grain legumes Volume 1: Advances in breeding and cultivation techniques Edited by Dr Shoba Sivasankar, Dr David Bergvinson, Dr Pooran Gaur, Dr Shiv Kumar Agrawal, Dr Steve Beebe, and Dr Manuele Tamò 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Advances in understanding grain legume physiology: stomatal behavior and response to abiotic stress: E. Troyo Diéguez and A. Nieto-Garibay, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste, México; J.L. García-Hernández, Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango, México; P. Preciado-Rangel, Instituto Tecnológico de Torreón, México; F. A. Beltrán-Morales and F. H. Ruiz-Espinoza, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, México; and B. Murillo-Amador, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste, México 
2.Advances in understanding grain legume physiology: understanding root architecture, nutrient uptake and response to abiotic stress: Yinglong Chen, The University of Western Australia, Australia and Northwest A&F University, China; Ivica Djalovic, Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, Serbia; and Kadambot Siddique, The University of Western Australia, Australia 
3.Conserving and characterizing the genetic diversity of grain legumes: P. J. Bramel and H. D. Upadhyaya, Global Crop Diversity, Germany and International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
4.Advanced breeding techniques for grain legumes in the genomics era: Juan M. Osorno and Phillip E. McClean, North Dakota State University, USA; and Timothy Close, University of California (Riverside), USA 
5.Genetic modification of grain legumes: Pooja Bhatnagar-Mathur and Kiran Kumar Sharma, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
6.Developing drought- and heat-tolerant varieties of grain legumes: Shoba Sivasankar, Former Director, CGIAR Research Program on Grain Legumes, India 
7.Developing pest- and disease-resistant cultivars of grain legumes: Diego Rubiales, Institute for Sustainable Agriculture, Spain 
8.Biofortification of grain legumes: Bodo Raatz, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
 
Part 2 Cultivation 
9.Variety selection and seed quality management in grain legume cultivation: Jean Claude Rubyogo, Pan-Africa Bean Research Alliance (PABRA), International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Tanzania; and Wilfred Odhiambo, Seed Systems Consultant, Kenya 
10.Grain legumes in integrated crop management systems: Chris Johansen and Kadambot H.M. Siddique, The University of Western Australia, Australia 
11.Grain legume–cereal intercropping systems: L. Bedoussac, ENSFEA, INRA AGIR, France; E-P. Journet, CNRS LIPM, INRA AGIR, France; H. Hauggaard-Nielsen, Roskilde University, Denmark; C. Naudin and G. Corre Hellou, Ecole Supérieure d’Agricultures, France; E. S. Jensen, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; and E. Justes, INRA AGIR, France 
12.Soil and nutrient management in grain legume cultivation: S. Adjei-Nsiah , International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Ghana ; and B.D.K. Ahiabor, CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Ghana 
13.Diseases affecting grain legumes and their management: Keith Thomas, University of Sunderland, UK 
14.Insect pests and integrated pest management techniques in grain legume cultivation: Tolulope A. Agunbiade, Yale University, USA; Weilin Sun, Michigan State University, USA; Brad S. Coates, USDA-ARS, USA; Fouss é ni Traore, Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, Burkina Faso; James A. Ojo, Kwara State University, Nigeria; Anne N. Lutomia, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; Julia Bello-Bravo, Michigan State University, USA; Saber Miresmailli, Ecoation Innovative Solutions Inc., Canada; Joseph E. Huesing, USAID, USA; Michael Agyekum, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, Michigan State University, USA; Manuele Tamò, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Benin; and Barry R. Pittendrigh, Michigan State University, USA 
15.Weed management in grain legume cultivation: Don W. Morishita, University of Idaho, USA 
16.Grain legume storage in developing nations: L. L. Murdock and D. Baributsa, Purdue University, USA 
17.Drying, handling, storing and quality monitoring of pulses: C.B. Singh, University of South Australia, Australia; and D.S. Jayas, University of Manitoba, Canada 
18.Dietary health benefits, phytochemicals and anti-nutritional factors in grain legumes: Elizabeth Ryan, Colorado State University, USA; Indi Trehan, Kristie Smith and Mark Manary, Washington University, USA 
19.The nutritional potential of grain legumes: an economic perspective: Alan de Brauw, International Food Policy Research Institute, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761361 ¦ Pub date: March 2018 ¦ Extent: 432 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of cassava Volume 2: Genetics, breeding, pests and diseases Edited by Dr Clair H. Hershey 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cassava genetic resources and breeding tools 
1.Advances in understanding cassava growth and development: Virgílio Gavicho Uarrota, Deivid L. V. Stefen, Clovis Arruda de Souza (UTM) and Cileide Maria Medeiros Coelho, University of the State of Santa Catarina (UDESC), Brazil; Rodolfo Moresco and Marcelo Maraschin, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil; Fernando David Sánchez-Mora, Technical University of Manabí, Ecuador; and Eduardo da Costa Nunes, Enilto de Oliveira Neubert and Luiz Augusto Martins Peruch, Santa Catarina State Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Agency (EPAGRI), Brazil 
2.Conservation and distribution of cassava genetic resources: Michael Abberton, Badara Gueye, Tchamba Marimagne and Folarin Soyode, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
3.Developing new cassava varieties: tools, techniques and strategies: Hernán Ceballos, Nelson Morante, Fernando Calle, Jorge Lenis and Sandra Salazar, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
4.Molecular approaches in cassava breeding: Luis Augusto Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
5.Marker-assisted selection in cassava breeding: Ismail Y. Rabbi, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
6.Advances in genetic modification of cassava: P. Zhang, Q. Ma, M. Naconsie, X. Wu, W. Zhou, National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China and J. Yang, Shanghai Chenshan Plant Science Research Center, Shanghai Chenshan Botanical Garden, China 
 
Part 2 Breeding improved cassava varieties 
7.Breeding cassava for higher yield: Piya Kittipadakul, Pasajee Kongsil and Chalermpol Phumichai, Kasetsart University, Thailand; and Shelley H. Jansky, USDA-ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit and University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA 
8.Breeding, delivery, use and benefits of bio-fortified cassava: Elizabeth Parkes and Olufemi Aina, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
9.Breeding cassava to meet consumer preferences for product quality: Adebayo Abass, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania; Wasiu Awoyale, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Liberia and Kwara State University, Nigeria; and Lateef Sanni and Taofi k Shittu, Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria 
 
Part 3 Managing pests and diseases 
10.Diseases affecting cassava: James Legg, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania; and Elizabeth Alvarez, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
11.Integrated management of arthropod pests of cassava: the case of Southeast Asia: Ignazio Graziosi and Kris A.G. Wyckhuys, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Vietnam 
12.Weed control in cassava cropping systems: S. Hauser and F. Ekeleme, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
ISBN: 9781786760043 ¦ Pub date: August 2017 ¦ Extent: 322 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of cassava Volume 1: Cultivation techniques Edited by Dr Clair H. Hershey 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 The cassava plant and its uses 
1.The emergence of cassava as a global crop: Doyle McKey, University of Montpellier, France and Marc Delêtre, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland 
2.Use and nutritional value of cassava roots and leaves as a traditional food: Aurélie Bechoff, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, UK 
3.Cassava for industrial uses: Kuakoon Piyachomkwan and Sittichoke Wanlapatit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Thailand; and Klanarong Sriroth, Kasetsart University, Thailand 
4.New uses and processes for cassava: Keith Tomlins and Ben Bennett, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, UK 
 
Part 2 Current cassava cultivation and opportunities for improvement 
5.Cassava cultivation in Asia: Tin Maung Aye, CIAT, Vietnam 
6.Cassava cultivation in sub-Saharan Africa: Dunstan S. C. Spencer, Enterprise Development Services Ltd, Sierra Leone; and Chuma Ezedinma, UNIDO, Nigeria 
7.Cassava cultivation in Latin America: Olivier F. Vilpoux, Denilson de Oliveira Guilherme and Marney Pascoli Cereda, Catholic University of Campo Grande, Brazil 
8.Drivers of change for cassava’s multiple roles in sustainable development: Clair H. Hershey, formerly CIAT, Colombia 
9.Targeting smallholder farmers to adopt improved cassava technologies: challenges and opportunities: Kolawole Adebayo, Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria 
10.GCP21: a global cassava partnership for the 21st century: Claude M. Fauquet and Joe Tohme, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
 
Part 3 Sustainable intensification of cassava cultivation 
11.Integrated crop management for cassava cultivation in Asia: Tin Maung Aye, CIAT, Vietnam; and Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
12.Seed systems management in cassava cultivation: James George and Sarojini Amma Sunitha, ICAR-Central Tuber Crops Research Institute, India 
13.Cassava cultivation and soil productivity: Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
14.Addressing nutritional disorders in cassava cultivation: Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
15.Nutrient sources and their application in cassava cultivation: Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
16.Intercropping and crop rotations in cassava cultivation: a production systems approach: Thomas W. Kuyper, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Samuel Adjei-Nsiah, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ghana 
17.Value chain approaches to mechanization in cassava cultivation and harvesting in Africa: George Marechera and Grace Muinga, African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF), Kenya 
ISBN: 9781786760005 ¦ Pub date: July 2017 ¦ Extent: 424 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Beverage and sugar crops 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of cocoa Edited by Prof. Pathmanathan Umaharan 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Genetic resources and breeding 
1.Taxonomy and classification of cacao: Ranjana Bhattacharjee, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; and Malachy Akoroda, Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Nigeria 
2.Conserving and exploiting cocoa genetic resources: the key challenges: Brigitte Laliberté, Bioversity International, Italy; Michelle End, INGENIC (The International Group for Genetic Improvement of Cocoa), UK; Nicholas Cryer, Mondelez International, UK; Andrew Daymond, University of Reading, UK; Jan Engels, Bioversity International, Italy; Albertus Bernardus Eskes, formerly CIRAD and Bioversity International, France; Martin Gilmour, Barry Callebaut, USA; Philippe Lachenaud, Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement, France; Wilbert Phillips-Mora, Center for Tropical Agriculture Research and Education, Costa Rica; Chris Turnbull, Cocoa Research Association Ltd., UK; Pathmanathan Umaharan, Cocoa Research Centre, The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago; Dapeng Zhang, USDA-ARS, USA; and Stephan Weise, Bioversity International, Italy 
3.The role of gene banks in preserving the genetic diversity of cacao: Lambert A. Motilal, The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago 
4.Safe handling and movement of cocoa germplasm for breeding: Andrew Daymond, University of Reading, UK 
5.Developments in cacao breeding programmes in Africa and the Americas: Dário Ahnert, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Brazil; and Albertus Bernardus Eskes, formerly CIRAD and Bioversity International, France 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
6.Cocoa plant propagation techniques to supply farmers with improved planting materials: Michelle End, INGENIC (The International Group for Genetic Improvement of Cocoa), UK; Brigitte Laliberté, Bioversity International, Italy; Rob Lockwood, Consultant, UK; Augusto Roberto Sena Gomes, Consultant, Brazil; George Andrade Sodré, CEPLAC/CEPEC, Brazil; and Mark Guiltinan and Siela Maximova, The Pennsylvania State University, USA 
7.The potential of somatic embryogenesis for commercial-scale propagation of elite cacao varieties: Siela N. Maximova and Mark J. Guiltinan, The Pennsylvania State University, USA 
8.Good agronomic practices in cocoa cultivation: rehabilitating cocoa farms: Richard Asare, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ghana; Victor Afari-Sefa, World Vegetable Center, Benin; Sander Muilerman, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Gilbert J. Anim-Kwapong, Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana, Ghana 
9.Improving soil and nutrient management for cacao cultivation: Didier Snoeck and Bernard Dubos, CIRAD, UR Systèmes de pérennes, France 
 
Part 3 Diseases and pests 
10.Cocoa diseases: witches' broom: Jorge Teodoro De Souza, Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Fernando Pereira Monteiro, Federal University of Lavras and UNIVAG Centro Universitário, Brazil; Maria Alves Ferreira, Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; and Karina Peres Gramacho and Edna Dora Martins Newman Luz, Comissão Executiva do Plano da Lavoura Cacaueira (CEPLAC), Brazil 
11.Frosty pod rot, caused by Moniliophthora roreri: Ulrike Krauss, Palm Integrated Services and Solutions (PISS) Ltd., Saint Lucia 
12.Cocoa diseases: vascular-streak dieback: David I. Guest, University of Sydney, Australia; and Philip J. Keane, LaTrobe University, Australia 
13.Insect pests affecting cacao: Leïla Bagny Beilhe, Régis Babin and Martijn ten Hoopen, CIRAD, France 
14.Nematode pests of cocoa: Samuel Orisajo, Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Nigeria 
15.Advances in pest- and disease-resistant cocoa varieties: Christian Cilas and Olivier Sounigo, CIRAD, France; Bruno Efombagn and Salomon Nyassé, Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD), Cameroon; Mathias Tahi, CNRA, Côte d’Ivoire; and Sarah M. Bharath, Meridian Cacao, USA 
 
Part 4 Safety and sensory quality 
16.Improving best practice with regard to pesticide use in cocoa: M. A. Rutherford, J. Crozier and J. Flood, CABI, UK; and S. Sastroutomo, CABI-SEA, Malaysia 
17.Mycotoxins in cocoa: causes, detection and control: Mary A. Egbuta, Southern Cross University, Australia 
18.Analysing sensory and processing quality of cocoa: Darin A. Sukha and Naailah A. Ali, The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago 
 
Part 5 Sustainability 
19.Climate change and cocoa cultivation: Christian Bunn, Fabio Castro and Mark Lundy, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia; and Peter Läderach, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Vietnam 
20.Analysis and design of the shade canopy of cocoa-based agroforestry systems: Eduardo Somarriba, CATIE, Costa Rica; Luis Orozco-Aguilar, University of Melbourne, Australia; Rolando Cerda, CATIE, Costa Rica; and Arlene López-Sampson, James Cook University, Australia 
21.Organic cocoa cultivation: Amanda Berlan, De Montfort University, UK 
22.Cocoa sustainability initiatives: the impacts of cocoa sustainability initiatives in West Africa: Verina Ingram, Yuca Waarts and Fedes van Rijn, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
23.Supporting smallholders in achieving more sustainable cocoa cultivation: the case of West Africa: Paul Macek, World Cocoa Foundation, USA; Upoma Husain and Krystal Werner, Georgetown University, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761682 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 588 pages ¦ Price £230/$300/€275 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of coffee - Breeding and quality traits  Edited by Dr Philippe Lashermes 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Diversity and genome evolution in coffee: Philippe Lashermes and Marie-Christine Combes, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), France 
2.Coffee tree growth and environmental acclimation: Fabio M. DaMatta, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil 
3.Environmental and genetic effects on coffee seed biochemical composition and quality: Thierry Joët and Stéphane Dussert, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), France; 
4.Ensuring the genetic diversity of coffee: Sarada Krishnan, Denver Botanic Gardens, USA 
5.Developing varieties of Arabica coffee: Herbert A. M. van der Vossen, Coffee Breeding Consultant, The Netherlands 
6.Developing varieties of Robusta coffee: N. Surya Prakash, Central Coffee Research Institute, India 
7.Developments in molecular breeding techniques in Robusta coffee: Alan Carvalho Andrade, Embrapa Café/Inovacafé, Brazi
8.Breeding caffeine-free coffee beans: Chifumi Nagai, Hawaii Agriculture Research Center, USA; and Jean-Jacques Rakotomalala, Centre National de la Recherche Appliquée au Développement Rural, Madagascar 
9.Disseminating improved coffee varieties for sustainable production: Charles Lambot and Juan Carlos Herrera, Nestlé R&D Center, France 
 
Part 2 Quality traits 
10.Chemical composition of coffee beans: an overview: Michael N. Clifford, University of Surrey, UK; Iziar A. Ludwig, Universitat de Lleida, Spain; and Alan Crozier, University of California-Davis, USA 
11.Bioactive compounds in coffee beans with beneficial health properties: Ningjian Liang, Kaiwen Mu and David Kitts, University of British Columbia, Canada 
12.Beneficial compounds from coffee leaves: Claudine Campa, UMR IPME, France; and Arnaud Petitvallet, Wize Monkey, Canada 
13.Nutritional and health effects of coffee: Adriana Farah, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 
14.Advances in research on coffee flavour compounds: Roberto Buffo, National University of Tucumán, Argentina 
15.Harmful compounds in coffee: Noel Durand, CIRAD, France; and Angélique Fontana, University of Montpellier, France 
16.Flavour as the common thread for coffee quality along the value chain: Mario R. Fernández-Alduenda, Coffee Quality Institute, USA 
17.Metabolomics as a powerful tool for coffee authentication: Sastia P. Putri and Eiichiro Fukusaki, Osaka University, Japan 
18.Life cycle analysis and the carbon footprint of coffee value chains: Louis Bockel and Laure-Sophie Schiettecatte, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786761521 ¦ Pub date: January 2018 ¦ Extent: 410 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Global tea science - Current status and future needs  Edited by Dr VS Sharma and Dr Kumudini Gunasekare 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Tea Breeding and Germplasm 
1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of tea: Jian-Qiang Ma and Liang Chen, Tea Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRI, CAAS), China 
2.Mapping and exploiting the tea genome: Xinchao Wang, Xinyuan Hao, Lu Wang and Yajun Yang, Tea Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRI, CAAS), China 
3.Advances in genetic modification of tea: Mainaak Mukhopadhyay, University of Kalyani, India; Tapan Kumar Mondal, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, India 
 
Part 2 Cultivation and Agronomy 
4.Planting and cultivation of tea: M. A. Wijeratne, Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka 
5.The effect of cultivation techniques on tea quality: P. Okinda Owuor, Maseno University, Kenya 
6.The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in tea cultivation: Shipra Singh and Anita Pandey, G. B. Pant National Institute of Himalayan Environment and Sustainable Development, India; and Lok Man S. Palni, Graphic Era University, India 
7.The role of microbes in tea cultivation: P. N. Bhattacharyya and S. R. Sarmah, Tocklai Tea Research Institute, India 
 
Part 3 Plant Protection 
8.Diseases affecting tea plants: G. D. Sinniah, Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka 
9.Insect pests of tea: shot-hole borers, termites and nematodes: Nalini C. Gnanapragasam, Former Deputy Director (Research), Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka; currently Agricultural Tea Consultant - Malwatte Valley Plantations PLC, Sri Lanka 
10.Insect pests of tea: caterpillars and other seasonal, occasional and minor pests: Nalini C. Gnanapragasam, Former Deputy Director (Research), Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka; currently Agricultural Tea Consultant - Malwatte Valley Plantations PLC, Sri Lanka 
11.Integrated pest management of tea insect pests: Nalini C. Gnanapragasam, Former Deputy Director (Research), Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka; currently Agricultural Tea Consultant - Malwatte Valley Plantations PLC, Sri Lanka 
12.Pesticide residues in tea: challenges in detection and control: A. K. Barooah, Tocklai Tea Research Institute, India 
 
Part 4 Tea Chemistry and Phytochemicals 
13.Instrumentation and methodology for the quantification of phytochemicals in tea: Ting Zhang, China University of Geosciences and Huanggang Normal University, China; Xiaojian Lv, Yin Xu, Lanying Xu and Tao Long, Huanggang Normal University, China; Chi-Tang Ho, Rutgers University, USA; and Shiming Li, Huanggang Normal University, China and Rutgers University, USA 
14.The potential role for tea in combating chronic diseases: Chung S. Yang, Rutgers University, USA 
 
Part 5 Sustainability 
15.Tea cultivation under changing climatic conditions: Wenyan Han, Xin Li, Peng Yan, Liping Zhang and Golam Jalal Ahammed, Tea Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRI, CAAS), China 
16.Assessing and reducing the environmental impact of tea cultivation: Thushari Lakmini Wijeratne, Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka 
17.Cultivation, production and marketing of organic tea: Nikhil Ghosh Hajra, Organic Tea and Agri-horticultural Consulting, India 
18.Supporting smallholders in tea cultivation: Atik Dharmadi, Research Institute for Tea and Cinchona, Indonesia 
ISBN: 9781786761606 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 558 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sugarcane Volume 2: Breeding, pests and diseases Edited by Prof. Philippe Rott 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Sugarcane genome sequencing and genetic mapping: Xiping Yang and Ramkrishna Kandel, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA; Jian Song, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA and Dezhou University, China; Qian You, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA and Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, China; Mengjuan Wang, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, China; Jianping Wang, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA and Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, China 
2.Advances in understanding of sugarcane plant growth and physiology: Frederik C. Botha, Sugar Research Australia and the University of Queensland, Australia 
3.Ensuring and exploiting the genetic diversity of sugarcane: Anna Hale, USDA-ARS, USA; Phillip Jackson, CSIRO, Australia; and James R. Todd, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.Advances in conventional sugarcane breeding programmes: Phillip Jackson, CSIRO, Australia 
5.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of sugarcane: Per McCord, USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Genetic improvement of sugarcane by transgenic, intragenic and genome editing technologies: Fredy Altpeter and Ratna Karan, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 2 Progress in understanding and managing diseases, pests and weeds 
7.Ensuring biosecurity in sugarcane cultivation: Nicole Thompson, Sugar Research Australia (SRA), Australia 
8.Viral metagenomics and sugarcane pathogens: Philippe Roumagnac, Jean-Heinrich Daugrois and Denis Filloux, CIRAD, France; and Dimitre Mollov, USDA-ARS, USA 
9.Progress in understanding fungal diseases affecting sugarcane: red rot: R. Viswanathan, A. Ramesh Sundar, R. Selvakumar and P. Malathi, ICAR-Sugarcane Breeding Institute, India 
10.Progress in understanding fungal diseases affecting sugarcane: smut: Claudia B. Monteiro Vitorello, Patricia Dayane Carvalho Schaker, Juliana Benevenuto, Natália de Sousa Teixeira e Silva and Sintia Silva de Almeida, University of São Paulo, Brazil 
11.Progress in understanding fungal diseases affecting sugarcane: rusts: R. Stuart Rutherford, South African Sugarcane Research Institute (SASRI) and University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa 
12.Progress in understanding viruses affecting sugarcane: Kathy Braithwaite, Sugar Research Australia (SRA), Australia 
13.Recent progress in understanding three major bacterial diseases of sugarcane: gumming, leaf scald and ratoon stunting: Monique Royer, Isabelle Pieretti, and Stéphane Cociancich, CIRAD, France; and Philippe Rott, University of Florida, USA 
14.Managing the soil biological community to improve soil health and reduce losses from nematode pests: Graham R. Stirling, Biological Crop Protection Pty Ltd, Australia 
15.Progress in understanding and managing insect pests affecting sugarcane: François-Régis Goebel, CIRAD, France; Julien M. Beuzelin, University of Florida, USA; and Mike J. Way, South African Sugarcane Research Institute (SASRI), South Africa 
16.Integrated disease management strategies in sugarcane cultivation: Jack C. Comstock and Sushma G. Sood, USDA-ARS, USA 
17.Integrated weed management in sugarcane cultivation: Calvin Odero, University of Florida, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761484 ¦ Pub date: March 2018 ¦ Extent: 468 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sugarcane Volume 1: Cultivation techniques, quality and sustainability Edited by Prof. Philippe Rott 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cultivation techniques 
1.The development of sugarcane cultivation: Louis Jean Claude Autrey, International Society of Sugar Cane Technologists (ISSCT), Mauritius; Salem Saumtally and Asha Dookun-Saumtally, Mauritius Sugarcane Industry Research Institute (MSIRI), Mauritius 
2.Crop modelling to support sustainable sugarcane cultivation: Abraham Singels, University of Kwazulu-Natal and University of Pretoria, South Africa 
3.The Sustainable Sugarcane Initiative: Biksham Gujja and U. S. Natarajan, AgSri Agricultural Services Pvt. Ltd., India; and Norman Uphoff, Cornell University, USA 
4.Good planting and cultivation practices in sugarcane production: Bernard L. Schroeder, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; Andrew W. Wood, Tanglewood Agricultural Services, Australia; David V. Calcino and Danielle M. Skocaj, Sugar Research Australia Limited, Australia; Alan P. Hurney, Edmonton, Australia; and Peter G. Allsopp, Seventeen Mile Rocks, Australia 
5.Improving soil management in sugarcane cultivation: Paul White and Richard Johnson, Sugar Research Unit– USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Improving nutrient management in sugarcane cultivation: Gaspar H. Korndörfer, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil 
7.Advances in sugarcane irrigation for optimisation of water supply: Jean-Louis Chopart, AGERconsult, France (Section 3.2 contributed by M. T. Sall, B. Ahondokpe, and G. Walter, Senegalese Sugar Company, Senegal) 
8.Best management practices for maintaining water quality in sugarcane cultivation: Jehangir H. Bhadha, University of Florida, USA; and Bernard L. Schroeder, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
9.Precision agriculture and sugarcane production – a case study from the Burdekin region of Australia: R. G. V. Bramley, CSIRO, Australia; T. A. Jensen, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; A. J. Webster, CSIRO, Australia; and A. J. Robson, University of New England, Australia 
10.Advances in harvesting and transport of sugarcane: Rianto van Antwerpen, South African Sugarcane Research Institute and University of the Free State, South Africa; Philipus Daniel Riekert van Heerden, South African Sugarcane Research Institute and University of Pretoria, South Africa; Peter Tweddle, South African Sugarcane Research Institute, South Africa; Ronald Ng Cheong and Vivian Rivière, Mauritius Sugarcane Industry Research Institute (MSIRI), Mauritius 
11.Cultivating sugarcane for use in bioenergy applications: key issues: Hardev S. Sandhu, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 2 Quality and sustainability 
12.Analyzing the processing quality of sugarcane: Charley Richard, Sugar Processing Research Institute and the New York Sugar Trade Laboratory, USA 
13.Predicting the effect of climate change on sugarcane cultivation: Fábio R. Marin, University of São Paulo (USP) - Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Brazil; Daniel S. P. Nassif, Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil; and Leandro G. Costa, Murilo S. Vianna, Kassio Carvalho and Pedro R. Pereira, University of São Paulo (USP) - Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Brazil 
14.Mitigating the impact of environmental, social and economic issues on sugar cane cultivation to achieve sustainability: Kathy Hurly and Richard Nicholson, SA Canegrowers, South Africa; Carolyn Baker and Michelle Binedell, South African Sugarcane Research Institute, South Africa; Vaughan Koopman, WWF-SA, South Africa; Graeme Leslie, Consultant Entomologist, South Africa; Geoff Maher, Zambia Sugar, Zambia; and Scott Pryor, North Dakota State University, USA 
15.Sugarcane as a renewable resource for sustainable futures: Francis X. Johnson, Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden 
ISBN: 9781786761446 ¦ Pub date: November 2017 ¦ Extent: 360 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Oil bearing crops 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of soybeans Volume 2: Diseases, pests, food and other uses Edited by Prof. Henry T. Nguyen 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Diseases, pests and weeds 
1.Oomycete and fungal pathogens of soybean: Anne E. Dorrance, The Ohio State University, USA 
2.Bacterial and viral diseases affecting soybean production: Glen L. Hartman, USDA-ARS and University of Illinois, USA 
3.Nematode pathogens of soybean: T. L. Niblack and H. D. Lopez-Nicora, The Ohio State University, USA 
4.Key factors limiting sustainable insect pest management in soybeans: M. E. O'Neal, Iowa State University, USA and R. Cox, EarthEmpower Consulting and Investment, Mexico 
5.Advances in disease-resistant varieties of soybean: David R. Walker, USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Advances in pest-resistant varieties of soybean: Shichen Zhang and Dechun Wang, Michigan State University, USA 
7.Integrated weed management in soybean cultivation: Bob Hartzler, Iowa State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Food and other uses 
8.Nutritional, nutraceutical and functional properties of soybeans: Suzanne Hendrich, Iowa State University, USA 
9.Improving the nutritional value of soybean: Istvan Rajcan and Jocelyne Letarte, University of Guelph, Canada 
10.Allergens in soybean: Eliot M. Herman, University of Arizona, USA 
11.Nutritional considerations for soybean meal use in poultry diets: Justin Fowler, University of Georgia, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761163 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 286 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of soybeans Volume 1: Breeding and cultivation techniques Edited by Prof. Henry T. Nguyen 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Advances in understanding soybean physiology and growth: M. B. Zhang and X. T. Chu, Centre for Integrative Legume Research, University of Queensland, Australia; H. N. Su, University of Queensland, Australia, and National Navel Orange Engineering Research Center, Gannan Normal University, China; A. H. Hastwell, P. M. Gresshoff and B. J. Ferguson, Centre for Integrative Legume Research, University of Queensland, Australia 
2.Maintaining and utilizing the genetic diversity of soybeans: Randall Nelson, USDA-ARS and University of Illinois, USA 
3.Advances in conventional soybean breeding techniques: E. E. Large, E. Beche, D. Mutoni and A. Scaboo, University of Missouri, USA 
4.Mapping the soybean genome: Xiaobo Wang, Anhui Agricultural University, China; and Lijuan Qiu, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
5.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of soybeans: T. Vuong, University of Missouri, USA; and D. Walker, USDA-ARS and University of Illinois, USA 
6.Advances in genetic modification of soybeans: Wensheng Hou, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
7.Advances in the drought and heat resistance of soybean: Heng Ye, Babu Valliyodan, Li Song, J. Grover Shannon, Pengyin Chen and Henry T. Nguyen, University of Missouri, USA 
8.Towards improving the salt tolerance of soybean: Ailin Liu, Wai-Lun Cheung, Wai-Shing Yung, Carol Lee, Fuk-Ling Wong, Kit-Wah Siu and Hon-Ming Lam, Center for Soybean Research of the Partner State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology and School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China 
9.Advances in flood-tolerant varieties of soybean: C. Wu and W. Hummer, University of Arkansas, USA; P. Chen, G. Shannon, H. Ye and H. T. Nguyen, University of Missouri, USA; G. Kaur and J. Orlowski, Mississippi State University, USA; T. Carter, USDA-ARS, USA; and B. Buckley, Louisiana State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
10.Modelling the effects of temperature and photoperiod on soybean reproductive development: H. Yang, University of Nebraska, USA 
11.Defining and implementing best management practices in soybean production: Daniel B. Reynolds, Mississippi State University, USA 
12.Sustainable soybean production research and practice: contrasting case studies from three soybean production areas: Roger W. Elmore, Rodrigo Werle and Charles Wortmann, University of Nebraska, USA; Phinehas Tukamuhabwa, Makerere University, Uganda; and Nathan Mueller, University of Nebraska, USA 
13.Supporting smallholders in soybean cultivation: the example of Zimbabwe: Byron Zamasiya and Kefasi Nyikahadzoi, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe 
ISBN: 9781786761125 ¦ Pub date: May 2018 ¦ Extent: 340 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of oil palm Volume 2: Diseases, pests, quality and sustainability Edited by Prof. Alain Rival 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Diseases and pests 
1.Fungal diseases affecting oil palm: Tan Joon Sheong, Lee Yang Ping and Sharifah Shahrul Rabiah Syed Alwee, Felda Global Ventures Research and Development, Malaysia; Létizia Camus-Kulandaivelu, Maxime Mercière, Alba Zaremski and Frédéric Breton CIRAD, France; and Christophe Klopp, INRA, France 
2.Diseases affecting oil palm: Elizabeth Alvarez, CIAT, Colombia 
3.Insect pests affecting oil palms: Laurence Beaudoin-Ollivier, Université de Montpellier and CIRAD, France 
4.Integrated pest management in sustainable palm oil production: Edgar Clive Turner and Julie Hinsch, University of Cambridge, UK 
5.The integrated management of bud rot disease and Phytophthora palmivora in oil palm: Gerardo Martinez, José Ignacio Sanz, Gabriel Torres, Greicy Sarria, Diana Velez, Franky Zuñiga, Yuri Mestizo and Francia Varon, Colombian Oil Palm Research Center – Cenipalma, Colombia 
6.Advances in disease-resistant oil palm varieties: Tristan Durand-Gasselin, Benoît Cochard and Hubert de Franqueville, PalmElit-CIRAD, France 
 
Part 2 Nutritional and sensory quality 
7.Bioactive compounds in oil palm: Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi, Ng Mei Han and Choo Yuen May, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
8.Palm oil and health: Jean-Michel Lecerf, Institut Pasteur de Lille, France 
9.The nutritional value of red palm oil: Hélène Delisle, University of Montreal, Canada 
 
Part 3 Sustainability and supporting smallholders 
10.Life cycle assessments of oil palm products: Cécile Bessou, CIRAD, France; Heinz Stichnothe, Thünen Institute of Agricultural Technology, Germany; Amir F. N. Abdul-Manan, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia; and Shabbir Gheewala, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Thailand 
11.Life cycle assessment (LCA) of palm oil in practice: the example of Malaysia: Vijaya Subramaniam, Zulkifli Hashim and Halimah Muhamad, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
12.Modelling the environmental impacts of agriculture, focusing on oil palm: Paul N. Nelson, James Cook University, Australia; Neil Huth, CSIRO, Australia; Marcus Sheaves, James Cook University, Australia; Cécile Bessou, CIRAD, France; Lénaïc Pardon, CIRAD, France; Han She Lim, James Cook University, Australia; and Rai S. Kookana, CSIRO, Australia 
13.Certifying sustainability in oil palm cultivation: Marcel Djama, CIRAD and MOISA, University of Montpellier, France and Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia 
14.Balancing oil palm cultivation with forest and biodiversity conservation: Carl Traeholt, South East Asia Programme Director, Copenhagen Zoo, Malaysia 
15.Waste management and recycling in oil palm cultivation: Salman Zafar, BioEnergy Consult, India 
16.Understanding smallholders in oil palm cultivation: a case study from Sumatra: Pierre-Marie Bosc and Cédric Gaillard, CIRAD, France 
17.Closing yield gaps for small- and medium-scale oil palm producers: improving cultivation practices : J. I. Sanz, M. Mosquera and J. A. Beltrán, Colombian Oil Palm Research Center – Cenipalma, Colombia 
18.Artisanal mills and local production of palm oil by smallholders: Sylvain Rafflegeau, CIRAD, UPR Systèmes de Pérennes, France; Doris Nanda, Université de Yaoundé I, Cameroon; and Claude Genot, INRA-UR BIA, France 
ISBN: 9781786761088 ¦ Pub date: March 2018 ¦ Extent: 462 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of oil palm Volume 1: Introduction, breeding and cultivation techniques Edited by Prof. Alain Rival 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Setting the scene 
1.The palm oil market: growth and trends: Stefano Savi, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, Malaysia 
2.Research trends in oil palm cultivation: Yuen May Choo, formerly The International Society for Fat Research (ISF), USA; and YewAi Tan, formerly Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
3.Sustainability pathways in oil palm cultivation: a comparison of Indonesia, Colombia and Cameroon: Ahmad Dermawan, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia; and Otto Hospes, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
4.The palm oil governance complex: progress, problems and gaps: Pablo Pacheco, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia; Patrice Levang, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia and Research Institute for Development (IRD), France; Ahmad Dermawan, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia; and George Schoneveld, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Kenya 
 
Part 2 Plant physiology and breeding 
5.Advances in understanding oil palm reproductive development: Estelle Jaligot, CIRAD, UMR DIADE (IRD, UM), France 
6.Diversity in the genetic resources of oil palm: N. Rajanaidu, A. Mohd Din, M. Marhalil, A. Norziha, O. A. Meilina, A. M. Fadila, A. B. Nor Azwani, L. Adelina, H. Zulkifli, S. Wan Salmiah and A. Kushairi, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
7.Advances in conventional breeding techniques for oil palm: Benoît Cochard and Tristan Durand-Gasselin, PalmElit SAS, France 
8.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of palm oil: Rajinder Singh, Chan Pek Lan, Maizura Ithnin and Umi Salamah Ramli, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
9.Advances in the genetic modification of oil palm: Denis J. Murphy, Head of Genomics and Computational Biology Research Group, University of South Wales, United Kingdom 
 
Part 3 Cultivation techniques 
10.Modelling crop growth and yield in palm oil cultivation: Christopher Teh Boon Sung, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia; and Cheah See Siang, Sime Darby Research Sdn. Bhd., Malaysia 
11.Improving soil health and crop nutrition in oil palm cultivation: Jean-Pierre Caliman, Suhardi and Pujianto, Smart Research Institute, Indonesia 
12.Maintaining soil health in oil palm cultivation: Bernard Dubos and Didier Snoeck, CIRAD, France 
13.Use of palm oil for biofuel: Jean-Marc Roda, CIRAD, France and Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia 
ISBN: 9781786761040 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 306 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Soil and water management 

Managing soil health for sustainable agriculture Volume 2: Monitoring and management Edited by Dr Don Reicosky 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Soil monitoring 
1.Soil health assessment and inventory: Indices and databases: Brian K. Slater, Ohio State University, USA 
2.Soil sampling for soil health assessment: Skye Wills, Stephen Roecker and Candiss Williams, USA-NRCS, USA; and Brian Murphy, Office of Environment and Heritage, Australia 
3.Biological indicators of soil health in organic cultivation : A. Fortuna, Washington State University, USA; A. Bhowmik, Pennsylvania State University, USA; and A. Bary and C. Cogger, Washington State University, USA 
4.The impact of heavy metal contamination on soil health: Santanu Bakshi and Chumki Banik, Iowa State University, USA; and Zhenli He, University of Florida, USA 
5.Modelling soil organic matter dynamics as a soil health indicator: Eleanor E. Campbell, University of New Hampshire, USA; John L. Field and Keith Paustian, Colorado State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Managing soil health 
6.Drainage requirements to maintain soil health: Jeffrey Strock, University of Minnesota, USA 
7.Managing irrigation for soil health in arid and semi-arid regions: Jeffrey Peter Mitchell and Howard Ferris, University of California-Davis, USA; Anil Shrestha, California State University-Fresno, USA; Francis Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; and Garrison Sposito, University of California-Berkeley, USA 
8.Effects of crop rotations and intercropping on soil health; Gilbert C. Sigua, USDA-ARS, USA 
9.Use of cover crops to promote soil health: Robert L. Myers, USDA – SARE and University of Missouri, USA 
10.Optimising fertiliser use to maintain soil health: Bijay-Singh, Punjab Agricultural University, India 
11.Manure and compost management to maintain soil health: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
12.Pesticide use and biodiversity in soils: Robert J. Kremer, University of Missouri, USA 
13.Conservation grass hedges and soil health parameters; Humberto Blanco-Canqui, University of Nebraska, USA 
14.Managing soil health in organic cultivation: A. Fortuna, Washington State University, USA; A. Bhowmik, Pennsylvania State University, USA; and A. Bary and C. Cogger, Washington State University, USA 
 
Part 3 Regional strategies in the developing world 
15.Supporting smallholders in maintaining soil health: key challenges and strategies: David Güereña, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Nepal 
16.Maintaining soil health in Africa: A. O. Ogunkunle, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; and V. O. Chude, National Program for Food Security, Nigeria 
17.Organic amendments to improve soil health and crop productivity: a case study in China: Minggang Xu, Wenju Zhang and Zejiang Cai, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; Shaoming Huang, Henan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; and Ping Zhu, Jilin Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
18.Soil health assessment and maintenance in Central and South-Central Brazil: Ieda C. Mendes, EMBRAPA Cerrados, Brazil; Cássio A. Tormena, State University of Maringá, Brazil; Maurício R. Cherubin, University of São Paulo, Brazil; and Douglas L. Karlen, USDA-ARS, USA 
19.Maintaining soil health in dryland areas: Pandi Zdruli, Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes (CIHEAM), Italy; and Claudio Zucca, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
ISBN: 9781786761927 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 462 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Managing soil health for sustainable agriculture Volume 1: Fundamentals Edited by Dr Don Reicosky 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Overview 
1.Soil and soil health: an overview: Mark G. Kibblewhite, Cranfield University, UK and Landcare Research, New Zealand 
2.Soil ecosystem services: an overview: Sara G. Baer, Southern Illinois University, USA; and Hannah E. Birgé, University of Nebraska, USA 
3.Soil health and climate change: a critical nexus: Promil Mehra, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Australia; Bhupinder Pal Singh, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, University of Newcastle and University of New England, Australia; Anitha Kunhikrishnan, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of Newcastle, Australia; Annette L. Cowie, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of New England, Australia; and Nanthi Bolan, University of Newcastle, Australia 
4.Integrated soil health management: a framework for soil conservation and regeneration: Daniel K. Manter and Jorge A. Delgado, USDA-ARS, USA; and Jennifer Moore-Kucera, USDA-NRCS, USA 
5.The economics of soil health: Maria Bowman , USDA-ERS, USA 
 
Part 2 Soil structure and composition 
6.Soil texture and structure: role in soil health: Rainer Horn, Heiner Fleige and Iris Zimmermann, Institute for Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Germany 
7.Chemical composition of soils: role in soil health: Samira Daroub and Claire Friedrichsen, University of Florida, USA 
8.Soil microorganisms: role in soil health: Penny R. Hirsch, Rothamsted Research, UK 
9.The role of soil fauna in soil health and delivery of ecosystem services: George G. Brown, Elodie da Silva and Marcílio J. Thomazini, Embrapa Forestry, Brazil; Cíntia C. Niva, Embrapa Cerrados, Brazil; Thibaud Decaëns, Université de Montpellier, France; Luís F. N. Cunha, Cardiff University, UK; Herlon S. Nadolny, Wilian C. Demetrio, Alessandra Santos, Talita Ferreira, Lilianne S. Maia, Ana Caroline Conrado, Rodrigo F. Segalla and Alexandre Casadei Ferreira, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Brazil; Amarildo Pasini, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Brazil; Marie L. C. Bartz and Klaus D. Sautter, Universidade Positivo, Brazil; Samuel W. James, Maharishi University of Management, USA; Dilmar Baretta, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Brazil; Zaida Inês Antoniolli, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil; Maria Jesus Iglesias Briones, Universidad de Vigo, Spain; José Paulo Sousa, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Jörg Römbke, ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Germany; and Patrick Lavelle, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France 
 
Part 3 Soil dynamics 
10.The role of soil hydrology in soil health: Melissa Miller and Henry Lin, Pennsylvania State University, USA 
11.Nutrient cycling in soils: E. A. Stockdale, Head of Farming Systems Research, NIAB, UK 
12.Plant–soil interactions: an overview: Richard W. Zobel, USDA-ARS, USA 
13.Mechanisms of soil erosion/degradation: R. J. Rickson, Cranfield University, UK 
ISBN: 9781786761880 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 352 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Water management for sustainable agriculture Edited by Prof. T. Oweis 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Fundamentals 
1.Understanding and measuring plant water use: Gretchen R. Miller, Texas A&M University, USA 
2.Dynamics of water storage and retention in soil: K. Rajkai, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary; F. Ács, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; B. Tóth, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Pannonia, Hungary; and A. Makó, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary 
3.Climate change and water resources for agriculture; Luis Garrote, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain 
 
Part 2 Sustainable use of groundwater and surface water for irrigation 
4.An integrated approach for the estimation of crop water requirements based on soil, plant and atmospheric measurements: N. Jovanovic, S. Dzikiti and M. Gush, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), South Africa 
5.The economics of groundwater development and governance; T. Shah, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), India 
6.Managing surface water for irrigation; A. Qureshi, International Center for Biosaline Agriculture, United Arab Emirates 
 
Part 3 Other sources of water for irrigation 
7.Rainwater and floodwater harvesting for crop irrigation: Dieter Prinz, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany 
8.The use of treated wastewater for crop irrigation: Alfieri Pollice and Ramy Saliba, IRSA-CNR, Italy; and Antonio Lonigro, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy 
9.Use of brackish and marginal water for irrigation in water-scarce areas: Z. Gao, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, China 
 
Part 4 Irrigation techniques 
10.Developments in surface irrigation techniques: Taffa Tulu, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia 
11.Trickle irrigation systems: Megh R. Goyal, formerly University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico 
12.An overview of subsurface irrigation techniques: Andrea Dührkoop and Oliver Hensel, University of Kassel, Germany 
13.Fertigation techniques for efficient water and nutrient use in agriculture; Munir J. Mohammad Rusan, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan and International Plant Nutrition Institute (IPNI), USA 
 
Part 5 Managing water use on the farm 
14.Modelling water use on farms; L. S. Pereira and P. Paredes, University of Lisbon, Portugal 
15.Improving water productivity in rainfed agriculture: challenges and opportunities for small-scale farmers in dry lands: John Gowing, University of Newcastle, UK 
16.Improving water use in tropical rain-fed systems: the situation in India: Suhas P. Wani, Kaushal K. Garg, Girish Chander and K.H. Anantha, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
17.Deficit irrigation and site-specific irrigation scheduling techniques to minimize water use: Susan A. O'Shaughnessy, USDA-ARS, USA; and Manuel A. Andrade, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, USA 
18.Drainage systems to support sustainable water use: Henk Ritzema, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Part 6 Managing water resources 
19.Increasing water productivity in agriculture: an overview: Wayne S. Meyer, University of Adelaide, Australia 
20.Regional strategies in sustainable water management for irrigation: the eco-efficiency approach: Mladen Todorović, Centre International de Hautes Etudes Méditerranéennes (CIHEAM), Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari, Italy 
21.The challenge of sustainable water resources management under water scarcity: Pasquale Steduto, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy; and Chris Perry, Former Research Director, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), UK 
22.Assessing the cost of supplying water for agriculture: the food supply cost curve: Roberto Roson, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786761767 ¦ Pub date: July 2018 ¦ Extent: 612 pages ¦ Price £230/$300/€275 

Crop management 

Achieving sustainable greenhouse cultivation Edited by Prof. Leo Marcelis and Dr Ep Heuvelink 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Greenhouse cultivation: present status, recent advances and future developments: Leo Marcelis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Part 1 Production systems 
2.Advances in greenhouse design: Juan Montero, formerly IRTA, Spain 
3.Advances in nethouse design: Josef Tanny, ARO, Israel 
4.Aquaponic systems for crop cultivation: Beatrix Alsanius, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden 
5.Advances in organic greenhouse cultivation: Martine Dorais, Laval University, Canada 
6.Vertical farming systems: Toyoki Kozai, Chiba University, Japan 
7.Energy saving in greenhouses: Silke Hemming, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Part 2 Aerial environment 
8.Understanding crop responses to controlled climates in greenhouses: Chieri Kubota, Ohio State University, USA 
9.Advances in climate control in greenhouse cultivation: Murat Kacira, University of Arizona, USA 
10.Advances in lighting for greenhouse cultivation: Xiuming Hao, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
 
Part 3 Root development 
11.Developments in growing media for greenhouse cultivation: Youbin Zheng, University of Guelph, Canada 
12.Advances in water/irrigation management in greenhouse cultivation: Stefania De Pascale, University of Naples, Italy 
13.Advances in nutrient management in greenhouse cultivation: Neil Mattson, Cornell University, USA 
 
Part 4 Systems management 
14.Automation and robotics in greenhouses: Eldert Van Henten, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
15.Models, sensors and decision support systems in greenhouse cultivation: Oliver Körner, Leibniz-Institute of Ornamental and Vegetable Crops, Germany 
16.Assessing the impact of environmental factors on the quality of greenhouse produce: Nazim Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany 
17.Advances in pest and disease management in greenhouse cultivation: Gerben Messelink, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
18.Assessing the environmental impact of greenhouse cultivation: Assumpcio Anton, IRTA, Spain 
ISBN: 9781786762801 ¦ Pub date: July 2019 ¦ Extent: 380 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Robotics and automation for improving agriculture Edited by Prof. John Billingsley 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Technologies 
1.Advances in location and guidance systems for agricultural robots: Felipe Neves Santos, INESCTEC, Portugal 
2.Advances in GPS technologies for agricultural robots: Liqiong Tang, Massey University, New Zealand 
3.Advances in machine vision technologies for agricultural robots: John Billingsley, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
4.Combining machine vision and other cues in navigation for agricultural robots: Tobias Low, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
5.Advances in actuation and control in agricultural robots: Pal From, Lincoln University, UK 
6.Advances in communication/control systems in agricultural robots: Scott Shearer, Ohio State University, USA 
7.Advances in human-robot collaboration in agricultural robots: Yael Edan, Ben Gurion University, Israel 
8.Crop scouting robots: Girish Chowdhary, University of Illinois, USA 
 
Part 2 Applications in crop cultivation 
9.Use of agricultural robots in crop spraying/fertiliser application: Ron Berenstein, University of California-Berkeley, USA 
10.Use of intelligent/autonomous systems in crop irrigation: Stefano Carpin, University of California-Merced, USA 
11.The use of agricultural robots in weed monitoring and control: Brian Steward, Iowa State University, USA 
12.The use of agricultural robots in orchard management: Qin Zhang, Washington University, USA 
13.The use of agricultural robots in harvesting soft fruit and vegetables: Simon Pearson, Lincoln University, UK 
14.Advances in automated in-field grading of harvested crops: Jose Blasco, IVIA, Spain 
15.Advances in using robots in forestry operations: Ola Lindroos, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden 
16.Advances in robotic milking: Marcia Endres, University of Minnesota, USA 
17.Advances in use of robots in meat processing operations: Ai-Ping Hu, Georgia Tech, USA 
ISBN: 9781786762726 ¦ Pub date: July 2019 ¦ Extent: 360 pages ¦ Price £160/$190/€215 

Advances in crop modelling for a sustainable agriculture Edited by Emeritus Prof. Kenneth Boote 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Modelling sub-systems 
1.Improving modelling of plant processes: Soo Hyung Kim, University of Washington, USA 
2.Improving models of plant growth and architecture: Jochem Evers, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
3.Incorporating genetic information in crop models: Bangyou Zheng, CSIRO, Australia 
4.Improving modelling of nutrient cycles: Upendra Singh, International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC), USA 
5.Improving modelling of water cycles in crop cultivation: Claudio Stockle, Washington State University, USA 
6.Improving crop pest/disease modelling: Jose Mauricio Fernandes, EMBRAPA, Brazil 
 
Part 2 Developing whole farm system models 
7.Key challenges in combining modular subsystems into whole system farm models: Marcello Donatelli, CREA-AA, Italy 
8.Whole farm system models in practice: APSIM: Holger Meinke, University of Tasmania, Australia 
9.Whole farm system models in practice: DSSAT: Gerrit Hoogenboom, University of Florida, USA 
10.Modelling crop rotations: long-term feedbacks for sustaining yield and soil properties: Bruno Basso, Michigan State University, USA 
11.Integrating livestock production into whole farm system models of mixed crop-livestock systems: Katrien Descheemaeker, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
12.Integrating economic simulation models into whole farm system models: John Antle, Oregon State University, USA 
13.Developing decision support systems (DSS) from crop and farm models: Clyde Fraisse, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 3 Developing larger scale models 
14.Developing landscape models to model agroecological systems: Claas Nendel, Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Germany 
15.Developing regional models of agroecological systems: Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA): Jerry Hatfield, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 4 Modelling issues 
16.Improving data sharing for developing, testing, and improving crop and farm models: Frits van Evert, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
17.Improving databases for model application for crop and farm models: Amor Ines, Columbia University, USA 
18.Dealing with uncertainty in crop models: Daniel Wallach, INRA, France 
19.Crop model inter-comparison and improvement: S. Asseng, University of Florida, USA 
20.The future of crop modelling for sustainable agriculture: Kenneth Boote, University of Florida, USA 
ISBN: 9781786762405 ¦ Pub date: October 2019 ¦ Extent: 380 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Advances in postharvest management of horticultural produce Edited by Prof. Chris Watkins 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Preservation techniques 
1.Advances in cooling technologies to preserve horticultural produce: Andrew East, Massey University, New Zealand 
2.Advances in controlled atmosphere storage of horticultural produce: John DeLong, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
3.Advances in modified atmosphere and active packaging of horticultural produce: Jeff Brandenburg, JSB Group, USA 
4.Advances in the use of barrier coatings in the preservation of horticultural produce: Elizabeth Baldwin, USDA-ARS, USA 
5.Advances in post-harvest ethylene management to preserve horticultural crops: Chris Watkins, Cornell University, USA 
 
Part 2 Safety management and disinfection techniques 
6.Key issues in post-harvest safety management of horticultural produce: Keith Warriner, University of Guelph, Canada 
7.Advances in understanding pathogens contaminating horticultural produce: Maria Gill, CSIC, Spain 
8.Advances in postharvest detection and monitoring of pathogens in horticultural produce: Byron Brehm-Stecher, Iowa State University, USA 
9.Advances in postharvest sanitising regimes for horticultural produce: Joshua Gurtler, USDA-ARS, USA 
10.Advances in using heat for disinfection/disinfestation of horticultural produce: Elazar Fallik, ARO, Israel 
11.Advances in the use of irradiation in the disinfection of fresh horticultural produce: John Golding, DPI-NSW, Australia 
12.Advances in the use of plasma treatments in the disinfection of fresh horticultural produce: Sukhvinder Pal (SP) Singh, DPI-NSW, Australia 
13.Advances in the use of ozone in the disinfection of horticultural produce: Marcin Glowacz, University of Greenwich, UK 
14.Advances in the use of natural antimicrobial/biocontrol agents in the disinfection of horticultural produce: Samir Droby, ARO, Israel 
 
Part 3 Monitoring and management 
15.Techniques for monitoring the postharvest quality of horticultural produce: Kerry Walsh, Central Queensland University, Australia 
16.Developments in automated sorting and packing of horticultural produce: Renfu Lu, USDA-ARS, USA 
17.Postharvest preservation of horticultural produce in organic production: Penelope Perkins-Veazie, North Carolina State University, USA 
18.Smart distribution to maintain shelf-life of horticultural produce: Jeff Brecht, University of Florida, USA 
ISBN: 9781786762887 ¦ Pub date: October 2019 ¦ Extent: 320 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable crop nutrition Edited by Prof. Zed Rengel 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Primary macronutrients: nitrogen 
1.Advances in understanding the nitrogen cycle in crop production: David Pilbeam, University of Leeds, UK 
2.Advances in understanding crop processing of nitrogen: John Foulkes, University of Nottingham, UK 
3.Advances in understanding the environmental effects of nitrogen fertilization: Sylvie Brouder, Purdue University, USA 
4.Advances in ways of optimising nitrogen use efficiency in crop production: John Angus, formerly CSIRO, Australia 
 
Part 2 Primary macronutrients: phosphorus 
5.Advances in understanding the phosphorus cycle in crop production: Erik Smolders, Katholieke University Leuven, Belgium 
6.Advances in understanding crop processing of phosphorus: Tim George, James Hutton Institute, UK 
7.Advances in understanding the environmental effects of phosphorus fertilization: Andrew Sharpley, University of Arkansas, USA 
8.Advances in ways of optimising phosphorus use efficiency in crop production: John Havlin, North Carolina State University, USA 
 
Part 3 Primary macronutrients: potassium 
9.Advances in understanding the potassium cycle in crop production: Richard Bell, Murdoch University, Australia 
10.Advances in understanding crop processing of potassium: Philip White, James Hutton Institute, UK 
11.Advances in ways of optimising potassium use efficiency crop production: Kaushik Majumdar, IPNI, India 
 
Part 4 Secondary macronutrients and micronutrients 
12.Secondary macronutrients: advances in understanding calcium cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising calcium use efficiency in crop production: Milan Mesic, University of Zagreb, Croatia 
13.Secondary macronutrients: advances in understanding magnesium cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising magnesium use efficiency in crop production: Stephan Jung, University of Giessen, Germany 
14.The effect of soil organic matter on plant mineral nutrition: Jose Maria Garcia-Mina, University of Navarre, Spain 
15.Micronutrients: advances in understanding iron cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising iron use efficiency in crop production: YS. Shivay, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India 
16.Micronutrients: advances in understanding zinc cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising zinc use efficiency in crop production: Gokhan Hacisalihoglu, Florida A&M University, USA 
17.Micronutrients: advances in understanding boron cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising boron use efficiency in crop production: Heiner Goldbach, HGo Tech, Germany 
18.Micronutrients: advances in understanding manganese cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising manganese use efficiency in crop production: Soren Husted, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
19.Micronutrients: advances in understanding molybdenum cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising molybdenum use efficiency in crop production: A. M. Missaoui, Institute of Plant Breeding Genetics and Genomics - University of Georgia, USA 
 
Part 5 Optimising fertilizer use: analysis and management 
20.Advances in assessing nutrient availability in soils: Kristian Holst Laursen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
21.Advances in integrated plant nutrition management: Bijay Singh, Punjab Agricultural University, India 
 
Part 6 Optimising fertilizer use: materials and technology 
22.Developments in fertilizers: Bryan Hopkins, Brigham Young University, USA 
23.Bio-effectors/bio-stimulants to optimise crop nutrient uptake: Gunter Neumann, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
24.Advances in fertigation techniques to optimise crop nutrition: Asher Bar-Tal, ARO, Israel 
25.Advances in foliar fertilizers to optimise crop nutrition: Victoria Fernandez, Technical University of Madrid, Spain 
26.Optimising use of animal manure in crop nutrition: Lars Stoumann Jensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
27.Optimising the use of treated wastes in crop nutrition: Ewald Schnug, Institute for Crop Soil and Science - JKI, Germany 
ISBN: 9781786763129 ¦ Pub date: November 2019 ¦ Extent: 520 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Precision agriculture for sustainability Edited by Dr John Stafford 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Information gathering and processing 
1.Proximal crop sensing: Richard B. Ferguson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
2.Proximal soil surveying and monitoring techniques: R. Gebbers, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering (ATB), Germany 
3.Airborne and satellite remote sensors for precision agriculture: Chenghai Yang, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.The use of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) in precision agriculture: Chunhua Zhang, Algoma University, Canada; and John M. Kovacs and Dan Walters, Nipissing University, Canada 
5.Key challenges and methods in identifying management zones: Spyros Fountas, Evangelos Anastasiou and Zisis Tsiropoulos, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece; Aristotelis Tagarakis, BioSense Institute - Research Institute for Information Technologies in Biosystems, Serbia; and Athanasios Balafoutis, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Institute of Bioeconomy & Agro-technology, Greece 
6.Modelling and decision support systems in precision agriculture: Nicolas Tremblay, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
 
Part 2 Delivery systems 
7.Variable rate application (VRA) technologies in precision agriculture: Ken Sudduth, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Spray technologies in precision agriculture: Paul Miller, Silsoe Spray Applications Unit Ltd, UK 
9.Intelligent machinery for precision agriculture: Qin Zhang, Washington State University, USA, Joseph Dvorak, University of Kentucky, USA; and Timo Oksanen, Aalto University, Finland 
10.Controlled traffic farming (CTF) in precision agriculture: Diogenes Antille, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 3 Applications 
11.Precision tillage systems: Pedro Andrade-Sanchez, University of Arizona, USA; and Shrinivasa K. Upadhyaya, University of California-Davis, USA 
12.Variable-rate seeding systems for precision agriculture: John Fulton, The Ohio State University, USA 
13.Site-specific nutrient management systems: Dan S. Long, USDA-ARS, USA 
14.Site-specific irrigation systems: Amir Haghverdi, University of California-Riverside, USA; and Brian G. Leib, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, USA 
15.Precision crop protection systems: E. C. Oerke, University of Bonn, Germany 
16.Precision weed management systems: Roland Gerhards, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
17.Precision livestock farming and pasture management systems: Mark Trotter, Central Queensland University Institute for Future Farming Systems, Australia 
18.The economics of precision agriculture: James Lowenberg-DeBoer, Harper Adams University, UK 
ISBN: 9781786762047 ¦ Pub date: October 2018 ¦ Extent: 514 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Improving organic crop cultivation Edited by Prof. Ulrich Köpke 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Crop breeding and cultivation 
1.Key issues in breeding and trialling robust cereal cultivars for organic farming: H. Spieß, B. Schmehe and C. Vollenweider, LBS Dottenfelderhof, Germany 
2.Organic seed production, certification and availability: Steven P. C. Groot, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands; and Maaike H. J. E. Raaijmakers, Bionext, The Netherlands 
3.Maintaining soil fertility and health in organic crop cultivation: C. Watson, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), UK and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; and E. A. Stockdale, Head of Farming Systems Research, NIAB, UK 
4.Cover crops in organic crop cultivation: Peter von Fragstein und Niemsdorff, Universität Kassel, Germany 
5.The role of crop rotations in organic farming: Bernhard Freyer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Austria 
6.Conservation tillage in organic farming: Maike Krauss and Paul Mäder, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland; Joséphine Peigné, ISARA-Lyon, France; and Julia Cooper, Newcastle University, UK 
7.Manure management in organic farming: Peter Sørensen, Department of Agroecology, Aarhus University, Denmark; Luca Bechini, University of Milan, Italy; and Lars Stoumann Jensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
8.Organic fertilizers and biofertilizers; Lidia Sas Paszt and Slawomir Gluszek, Research Institute of Horticulture, Poland 
9.Improving water management in organic crop cultivation: Michael J. Goss, University of Guelph, Canada; Adrian Unc, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada; and Wilfried Ehlers, Georg-August University, Germany 
 
Part 2 Crop pests and diseases 
10.Disease and pest management in organic farming: a case for applied agroecology: M. R. Finckh, S. M. Junge, J. H. Schmidt and O. D. Weedon, Universität Kassel, Germany 
11.Direct plant protection in organic farming: Bernhard Speiser, Hans-Jakob Schärer and Lucius Tamm, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
12.Integrated weed management in organic crop cultivation: Paolo Bàrberi, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy 
 
Part 3 Standards and monitoring 
13.Setting and reviewing standards for organic farming: Susanne Padel, The Organic Research Centre, UK 
14.Measuring and improving the environmental performance of organic farming: A. Muller, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL) and Institute for Environmental Decisions, Department of Environmental Systems Science, Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland; M. Meier and C. Schader, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland; A. Gattinger, Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Germany; and M. Steffens, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
15.Eco-functional intensification of organic farming; Thomas F. Döring, University of Bonn, Germany 
16.Biodiversity as a prerequisite of sustainable organic farming: Lukas Pfiffner and Laura Armengot, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
17.The impact of organic agriculture on diet and health: Kirsten Brandt, Newcastle University, UK 
 
Part 4 Organic crop cultivation in the developing world 
18.Supporting smallholders in organic crop cultivation: the case of East Africa: R. Onwonga, University of Nairobi, Kenya; K. P. Sibuga, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania; H. Nduku, University of Nairobi, Kenya; L. Sigsgaard, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; A. Saria and L. Shechambo, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania; M. M. Caceres, Tanzania Official Seed Certification Institute of the Ministry of Agriculture, Tanzania; C. Chepkoech, Q. Genga and R. Wahome, University of Nairobi, Kenya; N. Halberg, Aarhus University, Denmark; and H. Høgh-Jensen, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark 
19.Improving organic agriculture in the developing world: Africa: Victor Olowe, Institute of Food Security, Environmental Resources and Agricultural Research (IFSERAR), Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (FUNAAB), Nigeria 
20.Improving organic agriculture in the developing world: Asia: Sang Mok Sohn, Dankook University, South Korea 
21.Organic agriculture and agroecology in Latin America: Roberto Ugas, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Peru 
ISBN: 9781786761842 ¦ Pub date: November 2018 ¦ Extent: 480 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Pests and diseases 

Integrated management of insect pests: Current and future developments Edited by Emeritus Prof. Marcos Kogan 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Ecological foundation of Insect pest management 
1.Advances in identification and monitoring of crop insect pests and applications to IPM: Michael E. Irwin, University of Illinois, USA 
2.Advances in understanding species ecology of crop insect pests and applications to IPM: Leonard Coop, Oregon State University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding community ecology in agricultural systems and its applications to IPM: Peter Ellsworth, University of Arizona, USA 
4.Advances in understanding agroecosystems ecology and applications to IPM: Casey Hoy, Ohio State University, USA 
5.Advances in understanding the ecology of invasive crop insect pests and their impact on IPM: Robert Venette, University of Minnesota, USA 
6.Advances in understanding the behavioural ecology of insect/crop plant interactions and applications to IPM: Michael Stout, Louisiana State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultural and physical methods in IPM 
7.Advances in breeding crop plants for insect pest-resistance: E. A. Heinrichs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
8.Advances in application of genetic engineering of crop plants for insect pest resistance: Steve Naranjo, USDA-ARS, USA 
9.Advances in physical control methods in IPM: Charles Vincent, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
10.Technological advances in Integrated pest management: Linton Winder, Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology, New Zealand 
 
Part 3 Biological methods in IPM 
11.Advances in classical biological control in IPM: Ivan Milosavljevic, University of California-Riverside, USA 
12.Advances in conservation biological control and habitat management in IPM: Geoff Gurr, Charles Sturt University, Australia 
13.Advances in augmentative biological control in IPM: Joop van Lenteren, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
14.Integrated biodiversity management and the control of crop insect pests: the case of rice: Keizi Kiritani, formerly National Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Japan 
15.Integrated pest management (IPM) in greenhouse and other protected cultivation systems: Margaret Skinner, University of Vermont, USA 
16.Advances in microbial control in IPM: entomopathogenic fungi: Travis Glare, Lincoln University, New Zealand 
17.Advances in microbial control in IPM: entomopathogenic viruses: Sean Moore, Citrus Research International, South Africa 
18.Advances in use of entomopathogenic nematodes in IPM: David Shapiro, USDA-ARS, USA 
19.Advances in behavioural control of insect pests with semiochemicals: Jurgen Gross, Institute for Plant Protection, Germany 
20.Advances in genetic control of insect pests: the sterile male technique and other innovative approaches: Michael Bonsall, University of Oxford, UK 
21.Integrated pest management (IPM) of mites: Oscar Liburd, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 4 Chemical methods in IPM 
22.Chemical control in IPM systems: Advances in selective pesticides and application systems: Graham Matthews, Imperial College London, UK 
23.Ecological impacts of pesticides and their mitigation within IPM systems: Linda Thomson, University of Melbourne, Australia 
24.Monitoring and minimizing health and environmental risks related to pesticides: Anthony Youdeowei, ICIPE/University of Greenwich, UK Director of PAN-UK, UK 
25.Biopesticides in IPM: Vivek Kumar, University of Florida, USA 
26.Neuropeptide-based pesticides: Shireen Davies, University of Glasgow, UK 
 
Part 5 Implementation 
27.IPM decision support systems: Christine Poncet, INRA, France 
28.Economic assessment of IPM implementation: George Frisvold, University of Arizona, USA 
ISBN: 9781786762603¦ Pub date: June 2019 ¦ Extent: 520 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Integrated management of diseases and insect pests of tree fruit Edited by Prof. Xiangming Xu and Dr. Michelle Fountain 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Fungal diseases of fruit 
1.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple scab: Arne Stensvand, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), Norway 
2.Fungal diseases of fruit: powdery mildew: Achour Amiri, Washington State University, USA 
3.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple replant disease: Zhiquan Mao, Shandong Agricultural University, China 
4.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple canker in Europe: Robert Saville, NIAB-EMR, UK 
5.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple canker in Asia: Baohua Li, Qingdao Agricultural University, China 
6.Fungal diseases of fruit: brown rot: Imre Holb, University of Debrecen, Hungary 
 
Part 2 Bacterial and viral diseases 
7.Bacterial diseases of fruit: fire blight: Herb Aldwinckle, Cornell University, USA 
8.Bacterial diseases of fruit: brown spot/Pseudomonas canker: Kari Peter, Penn State University, USA 
9.Viral diseases of fruit: apple mosaic virus: Karel Petrik, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Czech Republic 
10.Viral diseases of fruit: plum pox: Pedro Martinez-Gomez, CEBAS-CSIC, Spain 
 
Part 3 Integrated fruit disease management 
11.Disease monitoring and forecasting in integrated fruit disease management: Angela Berrie, NIAB-EMR, UK 
12.Breeding disease-resistant fruit varieties: Vincent Bus, Plant and Food Research, New Zealand 
13.Improving plant propagation methods for fruit disease control: Ioannis Tzanetakis, University of Arkansas, USA 
14.Improving fungicide use in integrated fruit disease management: Mengjun Hu,University of Maryland, USA 
15.Use of biocontrol agents and biostimulants in fruit tree disease management: Jurgen Kohl, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
16.New techniques for managing post-harvest diseases of fruit: Antonio Ippolito, University of Bari, Italy 
 
Part 4 Insect pests of fruit 
17.Insect pests of fruit: aphids: Giuseepe Cocuzza, University of Catania, Italy 
18.Insect pests of fruit: tortricid moths: Alan Knight, USDA-ARS, USA 
19.Insect pests of fruit: mites: Rebecca Schmidt-Jeffries, Clemson University, USA 
20.Insect pests of fruit: mirids: Greg Krawczyk, Penn State University, USA 
21.Insect pests of fruit: fruit flies: Neil Audsley, FERA, UK 
 
Part 5 Integrated management of fruit insect pests 
22.Cultural control/agronomic practices to prevent or manage fruit insect pests: Matt Grieshop, Michigan State University, USA 
23.Improving monitoring and forecasting in integrated management of fruit insect pests: Tim Belien, pcfruit, Belgium 
24.Biological control in integrated management of fruit insect pests: promoting predator species: Dave Biddinger, Penn State University, USA 
25.Biological control in integrated management of fruit insect pests: the use of semiochemicals: Larry Gut, Michigan State University, USA 
26.Optimising insecticide use in integrated management of fruit insect pests: Claudio Ioriatti, FMACH, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786762566 ¦ Pub date: August 2019 ¦ Extent: 500 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Critical issues in plant health: 50 years of research in African agriculture Edited by Dr Peter Neuenschwander and Dr Manuele Tamò 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Managing threats to plant health 
1.Key challenges in plant health in sub-Saharan Africa: stakeholder priorities: Kenton Dashiell, IITA, Nigeria 
2.Introduction to critical issues in plant health: a 50-year retrospective on African agriculture: Peter Neuenschwander and Manuele Tamò, IITA, Benin 
3.Disease surveillance, diagnostics and germplasm health in crop protection: P. Lava Kumar, IITA, Nigeria; J. P. Legg, IITA, Tanzania; M. Ayodele, IITA, Nigeria; G. Mahuku, IITA, Tanzania; and A. Ortega-Beltran and R. Bandyopadhyay, IITA, Nigeria 
4.Conserving and exploiting biodiversity in crop cultivation in sub-Saharan Africa: Georg Goergen and Peter Neuenschwander, IITA, Benin; and Danny Coyne, IITA, Kenya 
5.Viruses and their vectors in sub-Saharan African crops: James Legg, IITA, Tanzania, P. Lava Kumar, IITA, Nigeria; George Mahuku and Everlyne Wosula, IITA, Tanzania; Livia Stavolone, IITA, Nigeria; Eugene Terry, New Markets Lab, USA; and Nilsa Bosque-Pérez, University of Idaho, USA 
 
Part 2 Plant health in practice: managing threats to key African crops 
6.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: cassava: M. Toko and P. Neuenschwander, IITA, Benin; J. S.Yaninek, Purdue University, USA; A. Ortega-Betran, IITA, Nigeria; A. Fanou and V. Zinsou, Université de Parakou, Benin; K. Wydra, Erfurt University of Applied Sciences, Germany; R. Hanna and A. Fotso, IITA, Cameroon; and O.K. Douro-Kpindou, IITA, Benin 
7.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: maize: Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, IITA, Nigeria; Kitty F. Cardwell, Oklahoma State University, USA; Alejandro Ortega-Beltran, IITA, Nigeria; Fritz Schulthess, Rheinstrasse 160, Switzerland; William Meikle, USDA-ARS, USA; Mamoudou Sétamou, Texas A&M University, USA; and Peter J. Cotty, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: yam, taro and cocoyam: Babatima Djana Mignouna, IITA, Benin; P. Lava Kumar, IITA, Nigeria; Danny Coyne, IITA, Kenya; and Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, Alejandro Ortega-Beltran, Ranjana Bhattacharjee and David De Koeyer, IITA, Nigeria 
9.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: banana and plantain: Stefan Hauser, IITA, Nigeria; C. Clifford Gold, International Agriculture Consultant, USA; Cornelia Pasberg-Gauhl and Friedhelm Gauhl, Consulting Office for Agriculture, Austria; Juliet Akello, IITA, Zambia; Kim Jacobsen, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Belgium; Lindsey Norgrove, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland; Daniel Coyne, IITA, Kenya; P. Lava Kumar, IITA Tanzania; George Mahuku, Manoj Kaushal and Valentine Nakato, IITA, Tanzania; and Leena Tripathi and Jain Tripathi, IITA, Kenya 
10.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: legumes: M. Tamò, IITA, Benin; L. Afouda, Université de Parakou, Benin; R. Bandyopadhyay, IITA, Nigeria; H. Bottenberg, United States Agency for International Development, USA; L. Cortada-Gonzales, IITA, Kenya; H. Murithi, IITA, Tanzania; A. Ortega-Beltran, IITA, Nigeria; B. Pittendrigh, Michigan State University, USA; R. Sikirou, Institut National des Recherches Agricoles au Bénin, Benin; A. Togola, IITA, Nigeria; and K.D. Wydra, Erfurt University of Applied Sciences, Germany 
11.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: vegetables: I. Godonou, IITA and Catholic University of West Africa, Benin; M.-G. Sæthre, IITA, Nigeria; G. Tepa-Yotto, IITA and Université Nationale d’Agriculture, Benin; D. Gnanvossou and O.K. Douro Kpindou, IITA, Benin; and D. Coyne, IITA, Kenya 
12.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: fruit and other tree crops: P. Neuenschwander and D. Gnanvossou, IITA, Benin; S. Hauser, IITA, Nigeria; G. Goergen, IITA, Benin; R. Hanna, IITA, Cameroon; L. Norgrove, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland; and K. Negloh and C. Agboton, IITA, Benin 
 
Part 3 - Integrated pest management: putting it all together and exchange of knowledge with farmers 
13.Commercial products promoting plant health in African agriculture: Frederick Schreurs and Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, IITA, Nigeria; Christiaan Kooyman, IITA, Kenya; Alejandro Ortega-Beltran and Adebowale Akande, IITA, Nigeria; Matieyedou Konlambigue, IITA, Ghana; Niels Van den Bosch, IITA, Nigeria 
14.Weeds affecting crops in sub-Saharan Africa: David Chikoye, IITA, Zambia; Friday Ekeleme, Stefan Hauser, Abebe Menkir and Alpha Y. Kamara, IITA, Nigeria; Peter Neuenschwander and Obinna Ajuonu, IITA, Benin; and Hakeem A. Ajeigbe, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Nigeria 
15.Integrated pest management (IPM) for crops in sub-Saharan Africa: Danny Coyne, IITA, Kenya; Michael Abberton, IITA, Nigeria; Sounkoura Adetonah, IITA, Benin; Maria Ayodele, IITA, Nigeria; Laura Cortada, IITA, Kenya; Brice Gbaguidi, IITA, Benin; Stefan Hauser and P. Lava Kumar, IITA, Nigeria; Peter Neuenschwander, IITA, Benin; Marc Schut, IITA, Rwanda and Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Manu Tamò, IITA, Benin; and Abou Togola, IITA, Nigeria 
 
Part 4 - Conclusions and future challenges 
16.Conclusions and future challenges; Peter Neuenschwander, IITA, Benin 
ISBN: 9781786762320 ¦ Pub date: December 2018 ¦ Extent: 360 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Pesticides and agriculture: Profit, politics and policy By Dr Dave Watson 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.The evolution of the pesticide industry in the Pre-Productivist Period (2500 BC–1929 AD) 
2.The evolution of the pesticide industry in the Productivist Period (1930–1973) 
3.The evolution of the pesticide industry in the Divergent Period (1974–2017) 
4.The evolution of the pesticide industry under Residual Productivism (1974-2017) 
5.The evolution of the pesticide industry under Neo-Productivism (1974-2017) 
6.The evolution of the pesticide industry under Post-Productivism (1974-2017) 
7.The evolution of the pesticide industry under the ‘Sustainability Paradigm’ (1974-2017) 
8.The future of pesticides and biotechnologies 
ISBN: 9781786762764 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 418 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Integrated weed management for sustainable agriculture Edited by Prof. Robert L. Zimdahl 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Weeds 
1.Weed ecology and population dynamics: Adam S. Davis, USDA-ARS, USA 
2.Weed-plant interactions: Bruce Maxwell, Montana State University, USA 
3.Invasive weed species and their effects: David R. Clements, Trinity Western University, Canada 
 
Part 2 IWM principles 
4.Key issues and challenges of integrated weed management: C. J. Swanton and T. Valente, University of Guelph, Canada 
5.Ethical issues in integrated weed management: Robert L. Zimdahl, Colorado State University, USA 
6.Surveillance and monitoring of weed populations: Anita Dille, Kansas State University, USA 
 
Part 3 Using herbicides in integrated weed management 
7.Site-specific weed management: S. A. Clay and S. A. Bruggeman, South Dakota State University, USA 
8.Assessing and minimizing the environmental effects of herbicides: Chris Preston, University of Adelaide, Australia 
9.Trends in the development of herbicide-resistant weeds: Ian Heap, International Survey of Herbicide-Resistant Weeds, USA 
 
Part 4 Cultural and physical methods for weed control 
10.The role of herbicide-resistant crops in integrated weed management: Prashant Jha, Montana State University, USA; and Krishna Reddy, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Cultural techniques to manage weeds: Matt Liebman, Iowa State University, USA 
12.The use of rotations and cover crops to manage weeds: John R. Teasdale, USDA-ARS, USA 
13.Developments in physical weed control: Eric R. Gallandt, University of Maine, USA; Daniel Brainard, Michigan State University, USA; and Bryan Brown, University of Maine, USA 
14.Flame weeding techniques: Stevan Z. Knezevic, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
15.Soil solarization: a sustainable method for weed management: Baruch Rubin, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; and Abraham Gamliel, The Volcani Center, Israel 
16.Weed management in organic crop cultivation: Greta Gramig, North Dakota State University, USA 
 
Part 5 Biological methods for weed control 
17.The use of allelopathy and competitive crop cultivars for weed suppression in cereal crops: James M. Mwendwa, Charles Sturt University, Australia; Jeffrey D. Weidenhamer, Ashland University, USA; and Leslie A. Weston, Charles Sturt University, Australia 
18.Bio-herbicides: an overview: Erin Rosskopf, USDA-ARS, United States Horticultural Laboratory, USA; Raghavan Charudattan, BioProdex Inc., USA; and William Bruckart, USDA-ARS, Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit, USA 
19.The use of microorganisms in integrated weed management: Susan M. Boyetchko, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada , Canada 
20.The use of bacteria in integrated weed management: Ann C. Kennedy, USDA-ARS and Washington State University, USA 
21.The use of insects in integrated weed management: Sandrine Petit and David A. Bohan, UMR Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRA, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, France 
ISBN: 9781786761644 ¦ Pub date: December 2017 ¦ Extent: 476 pages ¦ Price £230/$300/€275 

Integrated disease management of wheat and barley Edited by Prof. Richard Oliver 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Fungal diseases of cereals 
1.Diseases affecting wheat and barley: rusts: R. F. Park, University of Sydney, Australia 
2.Fusarium diseases: biology and management perspectives: Edward C. Rojas, Hans J. L. Jørgensen, Birgit Jensen and David B. Collinge, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
3.Diseases affecting wheat: Septoria tritici blotch: S. B. Goodwin, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.Diseases affecting wheat and barley: powdery mildew: Javier Sánchez-Martín, Salim Bourras and Beat Keller, University of Zurich, Switzerland 
5.Diseases affecting wheat: tan spot: C. S. Moffat, Curtin University, Australia; and F. M. Santana, Embrapa Trigo, Brazil 
6.Diseases affecting wheat: Septoria nodorum blotch: A. K. Ruud and M. Lillemo, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway 
7.A lesser-known pathogen of wheat: Bipolaris sorokiniana: E. Hill and P. Solomon, The Australian National University, Australia 
8.Diseases affecting wheat: wheat blast: J. L. N. Maciel, Embrapa Wheat, Brazil 
9.Diseases affecting barley: net blotches: Simon R. Ellwood, Curtin University, Australia; and Hugh Wallwork, South Australian Research and Development Institute, Australia 
10.Diseases affecting barley: scald: Wolfgang Knogge, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Germany 
 
Part 2 Key challenges in integrated disease management of cereals 
11.Challenges and prospects for fungicidal control of wheat diseases: R. J. Bryson and Horst-Dieter Brix, BASF, Germany 
12.Occurrence and avoidance of fungicide resistance in cereal diseases: Lise Nistrup Jørgensen, Aarhus University, Denmark; Richard Peter Oliver, Curtin University, Australia; and Thies Marten Heick, Aarhus University, Denmark 
13.Trends in exploring wheat and barley germplasm for novel disease resistance traits: Sambasivam Periyannan, Australian National University, Australia; and Lee Hickey, University of Queensland, Australia 
14.Developments in diagnostic techniques for cereal pathogens: Sadia Iqbal and Michael G. K. Jones, Western Australian State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre - Murdoch University, Australia 
15.Natural antifungal compounds for the control of diseases in wheat and other cereals: A. Schouten, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
16.The role of crop rotation, intercropping and tillage practices for foliar disease management of wheat and barley: T. K. Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; K. Xi, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Canada; and H. R. Kutcher, University of Saskatchewan, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786762160 ¦ Pub date: October 2018 ¦ Extent: 366 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Rice insect pests and their management By Prof. E. A. Heinrichs 

 
Table of contents  
 
1. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: root and stem feeders 
2. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: stem borers and rice gall midges 
3. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: leafhoppers and planthoppers 
4. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: foliage feeders 
5. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: panicle feeders 
6. Integrated pest management (IPM) of rice 
ISBN: 9781786761965 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 292 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Sustainability and organic 

Assessing the environmental impact of agriculture By Prof. Bo P. Weidema 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Life cycle assessment 
1.Current best practice in life cycle assessment methodology for agriculture: Miguel Brandão, KTH, Sweden 
2.Key challenges in modelling of agricultural activities and their environmental impacts: Evelyne Groen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
3.Using life cycle assessment to compare intensive versus extensive agricultural systems: Matthias Meier, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
 
Part 2 Modelling particular impacts 
4.Modelling nutrient cycles in agriculture and their environmental impacts: Rob Rees, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), UK 
5.Modelling the carbon cycle in agriculture and its impacts: Jorgen Olesen, Aarhus University, Denmark 
6.Modelling physical impacts of agriculture on freshwater and energy balances: Stephan Pfister, ETH Zurich, Switzerland 
7.Modelling the environmental impacts of pesticides in agriculture: Peter Fantke, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark 
8.Modelling direct and indirect land occupation and transformation and its impacts on biodiversity: Jannick H. Schmidt, Aalborg University, Denmark 
9.Including socio-economic impacts of agriculture in life cycle assessments: Bo Weidema, Aalborg University, Denmark 
 
Part 3 Case studies 
10.Improvement options for agricultural crop production for food, feed, bioenergy, and bioplastics: Benoît Gabrielle, INRA, France 
11.Improvement options for horticultural production for food, stimulants, and pharmaceuticals: David Granatstein, Washington State University, USA 
12.Assessing the environmental impact of livestock production systems: Mike Lee, University of Bristol, UK 
13.Improvement options for pig and poultry production: Greg Thoma, University of Arkansas, USA 
14.Improvement options for treatment and valorisation of agricultural by-products: Jerke W. De Vries, Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands 
ISBN: 9781786762283 ¦ Pub date: May 2019 ¦ Extent: 340 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Advances in Conservation Agriculture - Vol 2 By Prof. Amir Kassam 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Introduction: practice and benefits of CA systems: An overview: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
2.Crop and cropping systems management practices and benefits in CA systems: Muhammad Farooq, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman 
3.Soil management practices and benefits in CA systems: Michele Pisante, University of Teramo, Italy 
4.Weed management practices and benefits in CA systems: Gottlieb Basch, Universidade de Evora Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Portugal 
5.Insect pest and disease management practices and benefits in CA systems: Z. R. Khan, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Kenya 
6.Nutrient management practices and benefits in CA systems: Stephane Boulakia, CIRAD, France 
7.Water management practices and benefits in CA systems: Ivo Mello, IRGA, Brazil 
8.Carbon management practices and benefits in CA systems: João Carlos de Moraes Sá, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil 
9.Biodiversity management practices and benefits in CA systems: Scott Day, Fall Line Farms, USA 
10.CA and climate change mitigation and adaptability benefits: Emilio Gonzalez, Universidad de Cordoba, Spain 
11.Benefits of Conservation Agriculture to farmers and society: Patrick C. Wall, Sustainable Agricultural Systems, Mexico 
12.Social benefits of CA systems: Rafael Fuentes, Instituto Agronomico do Paraná (IAPAR), Brazil 
13.Harnessing ecosystems services with CA: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
14.Rehabilitating degraded and abandoned agricultural lands with CA systems: Telmo Amado, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil 
ISBN: 9781786762689 ¦ Pub date: July 2019 ¦ Extent: 300 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in Conservation Agriculture - Vol 1 By Prof. Amir Kassam 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Introduction: The need for sustainable agriculture and the role of CA in sustainable production intensification: an overview: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
2.Development of CA systems globally: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
3.The role of CA systems in soil and landscape health management: Don Reicosky, Soil Scientist Emeritus USDA-ARS and University of Minnesota, USA 
4.The role of no or minimum mechanical soil disturbance in CA systems: Theodor Friedrich, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy 
5.The role and management of soil mulch cover (including cover crops) in CA systems: Ademir Calegari, Agronomic Institute of Paraná, Brazil 
6.The role of crop and cropping system management in CA systems, including varieties, agronomy, rotations and associations: Peter Hobbs, Cornell University, USA 
7.Management of rice-based cropping system in CA: Debashis Chakraborty, Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI), India 
8.Management of horticultural CA systems involving root and tuber crops, and crops with yields at or below the ground surface: Jamil Abdalla Fayad, Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Company of Santa Catarina (EPAGRI), Brazil 
9.Managing CA-based perennial systems such as orchards, plantation, agroforestry, silvo-pasture and pasture systems: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
10.Integration of livestock in CA systems: John Landers, International Zero Tillage Consultant, Brazil 
11.Mechanization in CA systems: Augusto Guilherme de Araújo, Instituto Agronomico do Paraná (IAPAR), Brazil 
12.Certification schemes for CA systems: Dr Juliana Albertengo 
13.Institutional and policy support for CA uptake: Tom Goddard, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786762641 ¦ Pub date: July 2019 ¦ Extent: 280 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Preventing food losses and waste to achieve food security and sustainability By Prof. Elhadi M. Yahia 

 
Table of contents  
 
Food security: key issues: Hadi Fathallah, Recyclo, Lebanon 
 
Part 1 The problem of food loss and waste 
2.Food losses and waste: definitions, methods for estimation, estimates of extent and causes: Elhadi Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
3.The role of food losses and waste in food insecurity: Camelia Bucatariu, FAO, Italy 
4.The economic impact of food losses and waste: Abdallah Mohammed Omezzine, University of Nizwa, Oman 
5.The environmental impact of food losses and waste: Rob Lillywhite, University of Warwick, UK 
6.The impact of food losses and waste on human nutrition and health: Jorge Chávez, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
7.The impact of food losses and waste on food safety: Dima Faour-Klingbeil, Consultant, Lebanon 
 
Part 2 Causes of food losses and waste along the supply chain and their solutions 
8.Supply chain improvement to prevent food losses and waste: an overview: Hamid El Bilali, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Austria 
9.Food losses during agricultural production: Santiago Vergara, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
10.Food losses during harvesting and storage: Dirk Maier, Iowa State University, USA 
11.Food losses and waste during food processing: Hanne Moller, Østfoldforskning, Norway 
12.Food losses and waste during transport/distribution: Reiner Jedermann, University of Bremen, Germany 
13.Food losses and waste during marketing: Julian Parfitt, Anthesis, UK 
14.Assessing the impact of food waste reduction campaigns on consumer behaviour: Anne Sharp, University of South Australia, Australia 
15.Food losses and waste at the consumer level: Omar AlJabri, Qaboos University, Oman 
16.Food losses and waste in food service channels: Kirsi Silvennoinen, Natural Resources Institute (LUKE), Finland 
 
Part 3 Food losses and waste in different commodities 
17.Food losses and waste in cereals and grains: Tadele Tefera, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Ethiopia 
18.Food losses and waste in fresh fruit and vegetables: Elhadi Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
19.Food losses and waste in roots and tubers: Samuel Asiedu, Dalhousie University, Canada 
20.Food losses and waste in oilseeds and pulses: Adam Puteh, University Putra Malaysia, Malaysia 
21.Food losses and waste in meats: Carlos Sosa, UAQ, Mexico 
22.Food losses and waste in dairy products: Girma Gebresenbet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden 
23.Food losses and waste in fish and seafood: Inocencio Higuera, CIATEJ, Mexico 
 
Part 4 Reducing food losses and waste 
24.Policies and regulations needed to reduce food losses and waste: Lusine Aramyan, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
25.Investment needs and role of the private sector in reducing food losses and waste: Pilar Santacoloma, FAO, Panama 
26.Education, awareness and extension to prevent food losses and waste: Marcella Lembert, Bank of America, Mexico 
27.The role of food banks in food security and prevention of food losses and waste (FLW): Moez Elshohdi, Egyptian Food Bank, Egypt 
28.Re-using and recycling food waste: Munir Hanjra, IWMI, South Africa 
 
Part 5 Regional case studies 
29.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: United States: Leigh Prezkop, World Wildlife Fund, USA 
30.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: Europe: Camelia Bucatariu, FAO, Italy 
31.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: North Africa and the Middle East: Elhadi Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
32.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: sub-Saharan Africa: Tanya Stathers, NRI - University of Greenwich, UK 
33.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: Asia and the Pacific: Rosa Rolle, FAO, Italy 
34.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: Latin America: Tania Santivanez, FAO, Chile 
ISBN: 9781786763006 ¦ Pub date: September 2019 ¦ Extent: 500 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Achieving sustainable urban agriculture By Prof. Han Wiskerke 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Establishing urban agriculture 
1.The role of urban agriculture in mitigating climate change and improving food and nutrition security: Lawal Marafa, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China 
2.Creating a public policy framework to support urban agriculture: Han Wiskerke, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
3.Planning and design for urban agriculture: Nevin Cohen, City University of New York (CUNY), USA 
4.Business models for urban agriculture: Jan Willem van der Schans, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Part 2 Building urban agriculture networks 
5.Building communities/social networks for urban agriculture: Alison Blay-Palmer, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada 
6.Building continuous productive (peri-) urban landscapes: Andre Viljoen, Brighton University, UK 
7.Building natural resource networks: urban agriculture and the circular economy: Stefano Pascucci, Exeter University, UK 
 
Part 3 Technologies for urban agriculture 
8.Rooftop systems for urban agriculture: Francesco Orsini, University of Bologna, Italy 
9.Vertical farming systems for urban agriculture: Dickson Despommier, Columbia University, USA 
10.Irrigation/water management systems for urban agriculture: Olufunke Cofie, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Sri Lanka 
11.Waste management for urban agriculture: Rosanne Wielemaker, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
12.Pest management for urban agriculture: Giovanni Bazzocchi, University of Bologna, Italy 
 
Part 4 Product case studies 
13.Optimising horticulture for urban agriculture: Beatrix Alsanius, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden 
14.Optimising livestock production in urban agriculture: Delia Grace, International Livestock Research Institute (IRLI), Kenya 
15.Optimising aquaculture in urban agriculture: Angela Million, Technical University of Berlin, Germany 
16.Optimising beekeeping in urban agriculture: Erik Stange, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Norway 
17.Optimising urban forestry: Cecil Konijnendijk, University of British Columbia, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786763167 ¦ Pub date: December 2019 ¦ Extent: 320 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 
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